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I am trying to figure out how to smoothly connect isometric tiles at levels. For example, below are tiles at different levels. enter image description here I want to smoothly connect the tiles at the two levels based on the surface texture (the green grass on top). I can do a shear with the left and right halves of the top texture to connect a "corner", but I can't figure out what the transformation is to smoothly connect an entire face. For example, I want the 2nd level height to smoothly connect to the top texture of the bottom layer along the west facing side.

I looked at this old question here: How to create tilted (height) isometric tiles. but I can't understand the solution of "shearing to the right, then rotate by 45 and scale in height".

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I looked at this old question here: How to create tilted (height) isometric tiles. but I can't understand the solution of "shearing to the right, then rotate by 45 and scale in height".

The person who asked that question had started with a square tile, then rotated and scaled it to get an isometric one:

A sequence of images: green square; arrow and "rotate 45°"; green equal-height-and-width diamond; arrow and "scale height by 50%"; green isometric tile (half as tall as it is wide)

The top answer there was to add a skew step to the process: skew, then rotate, then scale:

A sequence of images: green square; arrow and "horizontal skew 27°"; green parallelogram; arrow and "rotate 45°"; green, skewed diamond, taller than it is wide; arrow and "scale height by 50%"; green "isometric slope" tile, shown joining two sets of normal (diamond) isometric tiles across a gap of half a tile across and down

Doing the skew first makes the tile end up skewed relative to the isometric grid, so it still lines up with other tiles.

You do need to find the correct skew angle for your isometric grid. There's probably an equation for this, but I got to 27 degrees for my grid by trial and error.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hey, thanks for the reply. I get it now. Now I just need to figure out what the formula the shear angle for an arbitrary height difference between the two neighboring blocks. I know the "angle of lift" is tan theta=2(h2-h1)/sqrt(w^2+h^2), where h2 and h1 is the difference in height between the tiles that need to be bridged and w and h are the tile width and height and that's as far as I got so far. \$\endgroup\$
    – lancen
    Jul 1, 2023 at 0:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm not sure of that either, sorry. I wonder if maybe you could calculate the angle of the tile edge in the rendered image, then run it through the reverse transformations (scale ×2, then rotate -45%) to get the skew angle somehow? \$\endgroup\$
    – Isikyus
    Feb 9 at 10:49

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