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This question is about the licensing of DirectXTK.

Is DirectXTK12 free for commercial use? I ask because I use it in my project, and I may want to go commercial in the future. If it is not, I'll create all the tools for my project.

Similarly for DirectXTex - is it also free for commercial use?

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    \$\begingroup\$ The license for DirectXTK12 is readily available. Whether or not it is good to use is a matter of opinion type question. \$\endgroup\$
    – Pikalek
    Commented Feb 15, 2023 at 18:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Pikalek it looks like a quotation or screengrab of that licence would make about as good an answer as this question could get, unless Preciado wants to clarify what part of that licence they need help understanding. \$\endgroup\$
    – DMGregory
    Commented Feb 15, 2023 at 18:48

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From the license posted in the DirectXTK12 repo:

microsoft/DirectXTK12 is licensed under the MIT License:

A short and simple permissive license with conditions only requiring preservation of copyright and license notices. Licensed works, modifications, and larger works may be distributed under different terms and without source code.

Permissions

  • Commercial use
  • Modification
  • Distribution
  • Private use

Limitations

  • Liability
  • Warranty

Conditions

  • License and copyright notice

Under that license you are entitled to the permissions (which includes commercial use) provided that you accept the limitations and conditions. It is 'free' in the sense that you don't have to pay for the license as listed, but using that license represents an agreement regarding the use and distribution of the software.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So, I have to give credits right? \$\endgroup\$
    – Preciado
    Commented Feb 15, 2023 at 20:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ No. I strongly suggest you carefully read the license. It says the copyright notice and permission notice must be included in all copies or substantial portions of the software. That's what you need to do to use it. Simply giving them credit is not the same thing. \$\endgroup\$
    – Pikalek
    Commented Feb 15, 2023 at 21:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ MIT is a 'permissive' license. This is a pretty good intro to these kinds of licenses: fossa.com/blog/open-source-licenses-101-mit-license. The "MIT" license is the standard open source license used for most Microsoft open source. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 15, 2023 at 23:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ Note that there is a 'No attribution' variant of the MIT license (called MIT0) which is essentially a "public domain equivalent license". DirectXTK12 / DirectXTex uses the original MIT license. "I'm not a lawyer", but MIT is designed to be extremely simple to understand, allows "free" commercial use, can be integrated into other OSS, and has minimal requirements. See also Wikipedia. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 15, 2023 at 23:12
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I am not a lawyer, as such, none of the following should be construed as legal advise. Please consult a lawyer.

Yes, you can use any MIT licensed in a commercial product without fees, royalties...

However the license and copyright lines must be distributed with the use of the code. Windows has a long file of these notices.

This is accomplished by including a text file packaged with the end product containing the following text:

DirectXTK12 used in this software is licensed as follows:
MIT License

Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all
copies or substantial portions of the Software.

I would include the fitness indemnity clause as well, but not specifically required:

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE

This clause means that if there is an exploitable bug in the the implementation and you get sued, that is on you, and not the original author of the code.

The same goes for DirectXTex.

Some projects choose to include one text file per project:

DirectXTK12.LICENSE

containing the above required text. Either way is acceptable.

Some licenses require(not MIT), compiled, in program attribution. This is accomplished with a credits tab on the main menu for games or in the Help->About for Windows Forms.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Generally speaking, "3rd party license" notifications are provided in the source repository for the project as you can see here. Microsoft and other companies also go through the effort of providing a full list of 3rd party notices for their shipped closed-source products such as here. What is "proper attribution" for shipped closed-source products using MIT license components has been interpreted a number of ways, but the safest thing is to just include it in a readme/doc. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 26, 2023 at 20:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ IOW: There's no requirement to put a big splash page of logos in your game for MIT-licensed stuff like you see for many commercial middleware solutions like Unity, PhysX, Bink, etc. There are also no fees associated with using MIT-licensed software components. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 26, 2023 at 20:52

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