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I found this on the About page on the official Pygame website:

Truly portable. Supports Linux (pygame comes with most main stream linux distributions), Windows (95, 98, ME, 2000, XP, Vista, 64-bit Windows, etc), Windows CE, BeOS, MacOS, Mac OS X, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, BSD/OS, Solaris, IRIX, and QNX. The code contains support for AmigaOS, Dreamcast, Atari, AIX, OSF/Tru64, RISC OS, SymbianOS and OS/2, but these are not officially supported. You can use it on hand held devices, game consoles and the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) computer.

I suspect this page is severely outdated as it doesn't even mention Windows versions beyond Vista, but it's quite intriguing to me that Pygame could potentially run on such old platforms.

What exactly does "contains support, but not officially supported" mean? Does it mean they could they technically run Pygame, but aren't thoroughly tested for bugs? Or are they just listing systems they think could run it, if they were willing to code it in?

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I'm not familiar with Pygame in particular, but as a general rule the word "support" can be used in at least three different but related ways:

  1. "X supports Y" / "X has support for Y": the software X has at some point been edited to work with platform/configuration Y, or tested on Y. If they write "has support for", this suggests it has specific code needed to run on Y, without which it would definitely not run on Y. (For example, graphics/UI libraries often need code to create windows on different window systems — Windows, X11, macOS, and Android, to name a few, have completely different APIs for that.)
  2. "Y is [officially] supported": the maintainers will consider it a bug if X doesn't run or misbehaves on Y, and work to fix it if informed. New versions of X are routinely tested on Y, if the project does any such systematic testing.
  3. "Y is [officially] supported": You can obtain technical support for your attempts to use X on Y, whereas if you ask for help with an unsupported configuration it may not be provided.

In your case, I expect the quoted text means that (1) is true and (2) is not. So, for example, the support (sense 1) might have been broken by recent changes that nobody tested on those platforms; there's no guarantee.

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