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The title says it all I'm doing a test with my game and I need to know how to set it up where my game loads low-level drivers from a System32 Folder that is in another path instead of this

example: C:\Windows\System32

a new path I want to have my game load drivers from: D:\Windows\System32

and can I make my game load low-level drivers from this path with some c++ coding in visual studio?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you define "load drivers" ? Are you talking about low level drivers that are tied to hardware? Or just using Window's libraries? \$\endgroup\$ – TomTsagk Dec 2 '19 at 11:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ low-level drivers that are tied to hardware like for example games use d3d9 drivers and user32 drivers and so on \$\endgroup\$ – jayloo Dec 2 '19 at 15:32
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Usually games load their .dlls from several places, including their own folder. I recommend putting anything you need loaded in the folder along with the game.

Requiring a D:\Windows\System32 would be not be a good idea because not everybody has a D: drive.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ That's, it no need to change the windows environment to load these low-level drivers from the new path were my game is located? \$\endgroup\$ – jayloo Dec 2 '19 at 15:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Correct, if I'm understanding properly what you're trying to do. \$\endgroup\$ – Almo Dec 2 '19 at 15:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ Okay. thanks man \$\endgroup\$ – jayloo Dec 2 '19 at 15:58
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I would advise against doing what you're trying to do, simply because you'll waste a lot of time.

Microsoft released drivers are released by, well... Microsoft. They integrate with the OS they produce. In ways that you do not want to mess with or work around: you'll most likely miss a reference: You'll set up Driver A that usually relies on Driver file X. If you forget to put that Driver file X at the correct location (because it's not documented, or you don't even know it exists), it will use the system one and have your tests fail, or it could simply crash.

Instead, I suggest you set up a workstation just for that, to test the "other set of drivers". The process is much more straight forward, is much more documented (hey you can do a system backup right after you set it up and restore it when you have more tests!), much less error prone, and will end up having you wasting much less time.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Okay, I will try that much appreciated for all that helped saves me time. \$\endgroup\$ – jayloo Dec 2 '19 at 16:00

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