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I am finishing my game project and I already have my steamworks registration, I am just fine-tuning details and preparing marketing for the start.

But I look a little short of cash, I would like to invest more in marketing, when I heard this, a friend recommended that I sell some educational games that I had done a while ago (type "dora the explorer") but I don't want to publish them in my account , since my current project is a game of gore, blood, violence etc. I don't think it's right that they are "together", can I generate a new steamworks account to publish my other games?

I have not found anything in the document confirming that yes or no

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I have never worked on steam but after few searches i found this on Quora:

Quote from "Adam Henley"

" The advice on Steam’s FAQ:

Should I create a new Steam account to post with?

This will depend on your situation. If your Steam account is already associated with a Steamworks partner and your submission is for that partner, then you should continue to use that Steam account. If you are a member of an existing Steamworks partner but wish to post a submission that will not be part of that Steamworks partner, then please create a new Steam account before you post.

If you represent a team of individuals or a company, you may find it beneficial to create a new Steam account to represent your team or company rather than using your personal account to post.

Src: Steam Workshop :: Greenlight FAQs

I can see benefits of creating a separate account, including but not limited to (other benefits available):

  • You may want to publish as a brand to look more professional
  • You may want to maintain the privacy of your existing Steam account
  • A VAC ban or bad feedback from a trade on your personal profile might look bad (even if they have innocent explanations).

Link To Quroa Post

Note: I don't have any experience with steam And I am not sure how legit is the above answer. I am just trying to help if i am able.

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