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I was wondering: what would happen if I published a game while the software I used is not available in my area?

I was planning to make a game using Unity Personal, and it just happened that it's not available in my area (Syria). Should I keep looking for alternatives or is it okay to publish it since I could download the software?

Here's the text that appears when I try accessing either unity.com or unity3d.com without a VPN connection:

Access Denied

You don't have permission to access "http://unity3d.com/" on this server. Reference #18.c7581002.1562292126.1b42107

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What exactly do you mean by "it's not available in my area"? \$\endgroup\$ – Pikalek Jul 4 at 19:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ We're not going to be able to answer this very well unless we know who's blocking it and why. If you're at work and your company's IT department is blocking it as a time-waster, then you've got no problems. If you're in a country which has deemed Unity worth blocking, then you might (or not). It would be really helpful if you could edit your question to include more information about your location, and also the full error message. (Also, I'm curious whether unity3d.com works for you...) \$\endgroup\$ – A C Jul 4 at 23:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Just updated with the info you asked for.. \$\endgroup\$ – user9180910 Jul 5 at 2:09
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    \$\begingroup\$ Consider looking into an engine like Godot, which being FOSS, may or may not have the same export restrictions apply. \$\endgroup\$ – QwertyChouskie Jul 5 at 20:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ @QwertyChouskie this post on Law.SE discusses some of the legal issues with trade restrictions on open source software in the US \$\endgroup\$ – Pikalek Jul 7 at 16:14
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Unity is not being made available to you due to trade restrictions:

Unity Technologies is listed and incorporated as a business in the U.S. This means that as a company, we must abide by the legal sanctions implemented by the U.S Government.

This means that some countries do not have access to the Unity sites. Currently countries on this list include Iran, Cuba, Syria, Sudan and North Korea.

Unfortunately, if you are a developer in any of the above countries there is not anything that can be done regarding your access to Unity. It is however, important to keep up to date with any changes that may be made by the U.S Government in relation to these sanctions.

Next, there's the matter of the Unity Software Additional Terms:

7. Export Law.
You agree to comply fully with all export laws and regulations to ensure that neither the Unity Software nor any technical data related thereto nor any direct product thereof are exported or re-exported directly or indirectly in violation of, or used for any purposes prohibited by, such laws and regulations.

Since your access is being restricted due to trade restrictions & they have disclosed the nature of the situation, my read is that your use of Unity would also violate their ToS, which means that you could be subject to the following from the Unity Terms of Service

7. Termination And Account Cancellation
Unity will have the right in its sole discretion, and without prior notice to you, to suspend or disable your Unity Account or terminate the Agreement and/or your right or ability to access or use any of the Services if: (a) you breach this Agreement; ...

As such, if you are using Unity when you are legally not permitted to do so, they can pull your account & products. They likely have some obligation to take action and that's a relatively easy solution for them to take which allows them to avoid some significant legal problems for being non-compliant.

There may be additional legal ramifications as well; for that you would need to consult with a lawyer. Ultimately, I can't tell you whether or not it's okay for you publish with Unity. All I can provide is my informed opinion & that is to do so would violate their terms of service and place your work in jeopardy. I wouldn't willing use such a strategy with my own work.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Even though not stated explicitly I assume the same restrictions apply to crimea. \$\endgroup\$ – McLovin Jul 6 at 8:00

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