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So I've seen a lot of installers, and on almost (if not every one, I don't keep track), all of them, there is a EULA, and specific items that are seen on all installers. However, I'm going to be making my own installer for a game, and I'm wondering if there's certain things that need to be included. Do I need a License Agreement? Should I have a license agreement? Etc.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I think a better question is, do you want a license agreement with customers? \$\endgroup\$ – TomTsagk May 26 '18 at 12:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ What legalese is required for your game's installer will depend on what kind of contract you seek to form with your players. Since most of us here are developers rather than lawyers, we might be able to help with the design of this relationship or the implementation in an installer, but we're largely not experts on the legalese itself. For legal advice, you should definitely consult a lawyer. \$\endgroup\$ – DMGregory May 26 '18 at 13:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ First step would be to actually read an existing EULA, to see what kind of things are there. The language is formal and strange. Formulate some questions and go to an actual lawyer. Lawyers are your friends! ;) Note: I'm not a lawyer :P \$\endgroup\$ – Artur Czajka Jun 3 '18 at 22:12
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It depends, as noted in the comments, on the agreement you want to make with users. It may also depend on the jurisdiction where you distribute the game, which may require you to grant (or deny) certain rights to users. If you use certain middleware or tools to build the game, they may require you to require certain things of users or present certain legal disclaimers.

You should absolutely consult a lawyer.

You generally do need some kind of license agreement; if nothing else you need to be granting the user the permissions to use, in limited form, the intellectual property you have distributed to them (by running the game's executable).

From a practical perspective you probably also want to disclaim certain responsibility (e.g., if the software deletes their hard drive because of a bug).

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