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I'm making this 2d side scroller game. I had been working on 3d games(modelling and animation) for 2 years, thus my experience with 2d sprites is none to zero.

So I've been struggling with asset creation in 2d especially thinking about animation is kind of stressing me out. There will be a lot of fighting animation in the game and may be that I'm new to 2d it just feels impossible to create a character and animating it do lots of combos.

An idea poped into my mind, using blender to create animation and rendering the animation as png to create spritesheet. I'm not sure if that's already a thing, I've did some research and there are people who do recommend and there are those who don't. It just felt a bit vague.

So my question is, would using blender to create 2d sprites and their animations be easier, since I'm exprienced with it. Or should I try to handle sprites in completely 2d? side note: every character is gonna be plain black(like shadow)

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There are several famous games which used 2d assets pre-rendered from 3d models. It was quite popular in the late 90s when 3d rendering was still too slow to render decent-looking characters in real-time but was already mature enough to generate good looking pre-rendered sprites. A popular title which pioneered this technique was Donkey Kong Country. It became a common technique for real-time strategy games before 3d hardware became capable of real-time rendering hundreds of units with decent level of detail at once. The technique is still used today from time to time. One recent title which comes to mind is Factorio. The developers posted an article about their workflow on their development blog which might be interesting to you.

It is mostly a question of the kind of aesthetic you want to go for. Hand-pixeled sprites just have a different style to them. I don't want to say better or worse, just different. The different aesthetic might or might not fit your game, but it might be worth a try.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for your answer! I will give it a try and see if it's a tecnique I'm comfortable with. \$\endgroup\$ – Lily Apr 7 '18 at 7:47

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