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i've used opengl core profile for a while now and i was wondering if it was possible to create a "decent" application (like a game/game engine) with good graphics. I have a machine which can run only OpenGl 2.1(raspberry pi3), i already know the advantages of core profile, but is Opengl 2.x still usable for today's standards?

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closed as off-topic by Alexandre Vaillancourt Nov 21 '17 at 17:48

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    \$\begingroup\$ OpenGL 2 only has relatively few aspects, that would stop this from happening. The fact that you use a raspberry pi is a bigger bottleneck. \$\endgroup\$ – Bálint Nov 20 '17 at 6:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ So, because of this i am limited by the raspberry pi instead of Opengl 2.x? Are there some examples in which Legacy opengl is used? \$\endgroup\$ – user100681 Nov 20 '17 at 6:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ Raspberry pi is not full OpenGL 2, it's ES2 and is therefore missing functionality. \$\endgroup\$ – Maximus Minimus Nov 20 '17 at 8:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ OpenGL ES 2.0 is actually still very common in the market as can be seen by computingfreak's answer in stackoverflow.com/questions/5110431/…. \$\endgroup\$ – Cpp plus 1 Nov 21 '17 at 20:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ Duplicate of gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/1606/… \$\endgroup\$ – Maximus Minimus Nov 22 '17 at 19:50
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First of all, you are very confused.

There is OpenGL ES 2.0, and there is desktop OpenGL 2.0 and 2.1. These are very different things, which run on entirely different platforms. ES runs on primarily mobile hardware, while desktop GL runs primarily on desktop hardware.

The core/compatibility distinction only exists for desktop GL, not OpenGL ES.

Raspberry Pi, of any version, does not support desktop OpenGL of any version. It only supports OpenGL ES 2.0.

As for what you can do with ES 2.0, a lot. You'll find Raspberry Pi's GPU to be limiting from a performance point of view, but you will have access to basic shader functionality. You can do a lot with that.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So if i write a program using opengl es 2 i can run(with of course all the required tools to create an apk) it on android, or any type of machine equipped with an arm processor. Right? \$\endgroup\$ – user100681 Nov 20 '17 at 8:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ @GabrieleVierti - wrong; the graphics API is only a part of what you need for portability; you also need to port sound, networking, windowing, and anything else platform-specific. \$\endgroup\$ – Maximus Minimus Nov 20 '17 at 10:13