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So I am developing a game and trying to find one of those to use, but I don't know what to search for. If you don't know what I am taking about, look at these examples:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

What are these called?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Someone protected this so I can't post an answer. But an older term that refers specifically to dots on gunsights is Tommy Dot. This probably won't help you though, because I doubt many video game designers use the term. \$\endgroup\$ – Steve Cox Nov 15 '17 at 15:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ Why was this protected? It feels a little odd that the presence of a single mediocre answer was enough to protect a question... \$\endgroup\$ – Steven Stadnicki Nov 16 '17 at 3:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ The pew pew hole \$\endgroup\$ – StartupGuy Nov 16 '17 at 19:26
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"Crosshairs" or an "aiming reticle," usually. Probably also "aiming dot" and similar variations.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Also spelled "reticule" (which, by delightful coincidence, also means a small ladies' handbag). \$\endgroup\$ – David Richerby Nov 14 '17 at 14:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ I've also seen the term "boresight" used for this \$\endgroup\$ – Tristan Nov 14 '17 at 18:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also "targeting reticle". \$\endgroup\$ – Klaws Nov 17 '17 at 17:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm used to use 'crosshair' myself. But didn't knew that it's actually a subterm of the 'reticle'. interesting to know. \$\endgroup\$ – Steven Nov 22 '17 at 12:16
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In addition to what Josh Petrie mentioned: if you're looking for more advanced ways to aim weapons, the center dot in your bottom image is also called a "pipper" in real-life applications.

This especially applies when some device is actively predicting where an arcing projectile will impact, like a bomb or grenade, instead of simply showing which direction it will go when fired/thrown/dropped.

Aircraft HUDs combine pippers and reticles to convey extra information about complicated firing solutions, as shown in this example:

Continuously Computed Impact Point Reticle Continuously Computed Impact Point Reticle

So in your third image, the circular arcs are the reticle, while the center dot is the pipper.

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That's usually called a crosshair. Also they're probably the easiest texture to make yourself, you don't need to find one online.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This adds nothing to the answers already posted. \$\endgroup\$ – Charanor Nov 15 '17 at 14:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's simpler. Some of the other answers contained more information than requested, which could be confusing to readers. This answer only answers the question directly. \$\endgroup\$ – Micheal Johnson Nov 15 '17 at 16:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please tell me how you answer is simpler than Josh Petrie's answer? It even contains more characters. \$\endgroup\$ – Charanor Nov 15 '17 at 17:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ This is a place to come to be informed. Dumbing down answers to provide one interpretation of what you believe to be the "better" answer completely misses the point. \$\endgroup\$ – user39686 Nov 15 '17 at 22:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ ... and if one is confused by the fact that more than one term exists that refers to the same thing, and the presence of a link, I'd imagine that person would have a couple more important issues to worry about. \$\endgroup\$ – Kroltan Nov 16 '17 at 13:21