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I have no idea about how would I make a building that can be entered in a game. Should I model separate parts of it and than combine them or should I model the entire thing as one object?

Are these things are built up in a 3D modeller like blender or if not where?

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    \$\begingroup\$ This question doesn't show much research effort. Yes, models used in games are generally created in modelling software like Blender/3DSMax/Maya/etc. As for whether and where to chop it into parts, that's a judgement call you'll need to make based on your game's needs. Some problems are easier to solve with the building in pieces (eg. kitbashing parts of buildings for greater variety out of a few meshes, "TARDIS-ing" buildings so the interior is larger, streaming parts at a time) while others are easier if it's all one piece (eg. if you can see inside from the exterior too) \$\endgroup\$ – DMGregory Jun 26 '17 at 20:15
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Let's look at Skyrim (because I have no idea about other games). It has both houses and big dungeons. These are made from "tile sets", there are separate 3d models for corridors, walls, furniture, etc. These can be culled when you don't see them, but most dungeons and houses are small enough to render them.

There are separate tilesets for dwemer stuff and for usual buildings, but you can mix them, and get something like Markarth.

So, you shouldn't cut the house into rooms or floors. Cut it into objects, that can be repeated. This way you save on the resources and you also give your artist(s) a bigger space for creativity.

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Are these things are built up in a 3D modeller like blender or if not where?

When you want anything in a Unity scene which is more complex than the basic shapes it offers, you won't get around either using a 3d modeling program or to generate the mesh procedurally from a script. When you don't need infinite randomly-generated variety, a 3d modeling program is usually easier.

Should I model separate parts of it and than combine them or should I model the entire thing as one object?

That depends. Do you have to split it? That depends on how many building you have, how large they are, what level of detail they have and the rendering capabilities of your target platform.

If it turns out that having a full high-def model of your building in your scene is too much, then splitting it up has the advantage that you can use LOD groups and thus allow Unity to use a different level of detail for each part of the building.

You might also get away with only activating the interior of the building when the player enters it and deactivating it when they leave it, but only if the player can not look into buildings from the outside or interact with things in buildings from the outside. You could even extend this system to only activate the room the player is in and any rooms they can look into from that room.

Also, any furniture items in your buildings which you might want to reuse (or even want the player to be able to interact with) should be individual game objects and not part of the geometry of the building interior. The reason is that Unity can save a lot of resources by reusing meshes. So if you have a room with 20 identical chairs, don't copy&paste the chair 20 times in your 3d modeling program. Model one chair as a separate 3d model, create one chair-prefab from it in Unity and drag it into the scene 20 times as children of the building interior.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I think making stairs walkable also should be mentioned here \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Jun 27 '17 at 14:46
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Game engines are tools available for game designers to code and plan out a game quickly and easily without building one from the ground up. Whether they are 2D or 3D based, they offer tools to aid in asset creation and placement.

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There are so many good options out there today for mobile game development that any list is going to be incomplete.

Unity - Though often considered to be the best SDK for 3D mobile games, their 2D technology is now also up there with the best of them. Because it’s so popular there is a huge community and loads of resources.

Corona Labs - The claim is that you can create games 10 times faster than with other SDKs. It’s easy to learn and also has a large community. Could be the right choice for a 2D game.

GameSalad - While lesser known than the first two, it’s still a great platform for games that deserves a look. Might be a better choice for a less experienced developer. Good ad network integration.

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