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I have decided on the stats being vitality, strength, intelligence, speed and endurance.

While HP and MP are decided by vitality, both physical attack and defence are derived from strength.

Intelligence decides both magic attack and magic deffense while speed changes how fast the character is and endurance increases things like equip load burden.

In rpgs I have played different characters depending on how the designer wanted them to feel (i.e. a muscular brute may have a higher strength but lower intelligence) the character may have higher stats in a certain area.

While I can understand that I do not understand how I should structure stat increases that happen when leveling up. For a test character I set all of their stats equal to 10 (I decided to start all characters with a base 50 stat total for now) the characters stats should move up anywhere from 0 to lets say 9 at most when leveling up.

So what is a way to decide which stats go up and by how much when the character levels?

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closed as too broad by DMGregory, Josh Mar 12 '17 at 16:24

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ There are as many ways to design a stat progression system as there are designers who've done it, depending on what they wanted in their games. So I'm afraid asking for "a way" might be a bit too broad. Consider doing some research on how other designers made these decisions in their games, and use that inspiration to formulate a plan of your own. Then if you got any snags, (eg. "I need this particular outcome/curve, but I don't know what formula achieves that") you can come back here and ask a more specific question. \$\endgroup\$ – DMGregory Mar 12 '17 at 15:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ It seems a bit like you are approaching the problem from the wrong direction. You should first decide how you want your game to play. Then you think about the mathematical formulas which achieve that kind of gameplay. Then you design the progression mechanics around those formulas. \$\endgroup\$ – Philipp Mar 12 '17 at 17:11