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I get too unsatisfying results for shadows when using a point light that is far away. (The quality settings are maxed.)

The scene:

scene view

The result:

game view

The light:

light

What can I do to get better shadows?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Increase the size of your objects, they are to tiny so thats why you see pixelated shadows. \$\endgroup\$
    – domi
    Jul 14, 2016 at 16:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ make them bigger, move the light, increase range. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ryan white
    Aug 17, 2016 at 11:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ i mean move the light in the respectable size, so its about the same scale. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ryan white
    Aug 17, 2016 at 12:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ for the third time, resize the object, then move the light away, !"AWAY"! from the object. not towards it, move it AWAY from the object, to get the appropriate distance! \$\endgroup\$
    – Ryan white
    Aug 18, 2016 at 8:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ "There is a reason I put the word "distant" in the title. The light is distant. I know the shadow gets better when you put the light near the object. So please stop suggesting to move the light. – S. Tarık Çetin 19 hours ago " i am not suggesting you move it close... you know what no its fine resolve this on your own. i tested it, it worked for me. Making it bigger and moving the light AWAY to be the appropriate distance worked. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ryan white
    Aug 18, 2016 at 11:54

2 Answers 2

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Point lights are not usually used for distant lighting. Use a Spot light instead. The results will be better.

Be sure to increase the Range.

If looks too bright, decrease Intensity.

Example of spot light shadow

Range 130, Intensity 1.3, Anti aliasing 8x multi, Shadow Res Very high.

Distance between light and shadow receiver 30 Unit. Distance between light and shadow caster 25 Unit.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Increasing range didn't change anything. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 14, 2016 at 9:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ +1 for spot light. A point light uses a cubemap for shadows, which means 99.9% of your texels are facing in directions where there's no planetoid to cast or receive a shadow. Only a few texels will land anywhere close to a planetoid. By switching to spot lights — one for each planetoid or cluster thereof — you can tighten the beam to put the shadow map texels where you need them most. But if your shadowcasters are only round planetoids, you could also calculate analytical shadows in the shader for perfectly smooth shadows and no shadow mapping cost. \$\endgroup\$
    – DMGregory
    Aug 16, 2023 at 16:12
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Use hard shadow instead of soft shadows.

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