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I want to create a gif style video that shows up in a tutorial window using Unity. How can I make this? Do I record the thing I want to show and then put it in a texture?

Example: enter image description here enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "Do I record the thing I want to show and then put it in a texture?" That's certainly one way to do it. In games this is usually called an animated texture or flipbook texture. Unity's particle system has built-in support for playing this kind of animation, but it's not too difficult to add the functionality in other ways. \$\endgroup\$
    – DMGregory
    Jun 2, 2016 at 17:53

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Whole sprite animation with PNG sequence in mecanim is one way to go and loop the animation with delay for repetitive showcase. [Will take more asset space]

Or you can animate all small pieces in mecanim and loop it with delay for repetitive showcase. [Will need less asset space]

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Since it appears that what you are doing is tutoring people in game mechanics, an elegant solution presents itself:

Use the game mechanic you're tutoring.

If the architecture of your game allows it, create a scaled game board that is set up in a useful tutorial state, allowing a player to either trigger the mechanic as they would in game (with some kind of indicator, like a glowing square in this case, if necessary), and with a button named 'Show me!' that has a computer player do the action, triggering the game mechanic.

If the architecture of your game doesn't support making a scaled board like this, consider replacing the popups with tutorial levels instead, where the RNG is cooked to give the desired assets to the players to complete the tutorial (as applicable).

Edit:

As an alternative, nix the tutorial all together and throw the player into the deep end, keeping track of what game mechanics they've triggered and seen.

Whenever a new game mechanic is discovered, instead of a pop up, slide in a bumper with a brief explanation of what just happened; if possible while the action is still going on, pausing the view and letting the player absorb the information at their own pace until dismissal of the bumper.

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