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I made a game prototype and want to improve some of rendering the visuals through light baking (which I'm new to). While I was mostly able to do this in my environiments, I'm having issues doing this for my characters in Unity. Previously, they came out with odd-ish dark shadows in places as they were affected by light and dull colors. After I begin light baking though and adding Light probes in areas that my characters would be extremely light, especailly on the skin areas. It doesn't look good at all.

enter image description here

Alternatively, without using light probes, it looks like this.

enter image description here

I'm genuinely confused on how to properly light these characters if I can't get a middle ground of proper lighting. Can anyone help me try to understand this and solve this problem?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Set your light type to Mixed. Make sure it isn't Baked only. \$\endgroup\$ – EvilTak Dec 16 '15 at 19:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Tried that. It just stuck me with the same results for the first picture. Any other ideas? \$\endgroup\$ – JSparks Dec 18 '15 at 2:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you post a screenshot of your Lighting tab and main Light in the Inspector? \$\endgroup\$ – EvilTak Dec 18 '15 at 4:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ Here. I did switch back my lights to realtime since it seems a bit better than mixed, but I'm willing to change it if it will produce better results. imgur.com/a/mk7Gz \$\endgroup\$ – JSparks Dec 18 '15 at 5:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Set the Light Intensity to one or less than one fora realistic value and increase the Ambient Light Intensity to compensate for the lower light intensity. You'll have to keep the Light type Mixed to get Baked GI working. Or you can use Precomputed Realtime GI if you have moving lights/lights which are turned on and off (eg. street lights), but otherwise it'll just eat up (not much) your CPU and GPU. In your case I'd use Realtime GI with Light Probes if you have a night scene and you want head lights and/or street lights to contribute to GI. \$\endgroup\$ – EvilTak Dec 18 '15 at 6:40
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I highly recommend using HDR and tonemapping to get lighting under control. For a somewhat realistic render your lights are supposed to be set quite high. You then use tone mapping to bring all the lightning back under control. You didn't mention what platform you are targeting. If it is Desktop or Webplayer then tonemapping is the way to go.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I am targeting web player, but I also want to be prepared for a desktop export. \$\endgroup\$ – JSparks Dec 21 '15 at 17:35

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