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I've been creating an adventure game using 45 degree angled tiles to create a 3D illusion- aka oblique style.

Using 45-degree angles...

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I can create pretty much any size or shape building I want:

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I found I can easily get another perspective if I simply flip the tiles horizontally:

enter image description here

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While doing this gains an oblique perspective from the other way, it does change the vanishing point to be in the center of the map, versus towards the top left.

Is this style of mixing perspectives common? Does it ruin the perspective or add to it? I thought that just maintaining the point of origin at the top left the whole time would be monotonous.

To be clear, I wouldn't keep the two styles together. It'd be either like the buildings on the river or the buildings in the northwest.

Thanks


Edit: More of a full shot:

enter image description here

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Mixing perspectives is very uncommon and, at least in your example, is bad because the perspective of the foreground (buildings in front of the river) do not match those in the background. There is one notable game that uses mixed perspectives:

Zelda: A Link to the Past

Zelda: A Link to the Past

If you look carefully, there is no single vanishing point. The corner walls in particular are simply reused. The perspective makes no sense in this game.

However, it's not so bad in this game because the camera is fixed. The same advice applies to your game: if your camera is fixed, you can get away with this, with the buildings all oriented with respect to the camera. But if your camera is dynamic, either stick with a single orthogonal projection, or go with proper 3D perspective.

Also, noting that you tagged with , the classic Sierra/LucasArts adventure games had these static perspective scenes, but again the camera was fixed.

Police Quest

Police Quest

This is because when the projection clashes with the camera, it disrupts the visual coherence of the scene, making the scene and the subjects seem out of place. I won't say you definitely can't do it, it may even be a distinctive style, but according to common practice it would be awkward.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can I get away with making the roads and rivers at different angles (see above) and keeping the building angles the same? \$\endgroup\$ – Growler Jul 7 '15 at 1:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Growler roads and rivers are more flexible; if they don't match with the axes then they'll be interpreted as diagonals. However your updated example buildings are worse, the vanishing points are all in conflict, unlike the Zelda example I gave where they are generally towards the centre. I wouldn't recommend your approach. \$\endgroup\$ – congusbongus Jul 7 '15 at 1:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ To be clear, I wouldn't keep the two styles together. It'd be either like the buildings on the river or the buildings in the northwest. \$\endgroup\$ – Growler Jul 7 '15 at 1:32
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The problem here is not technical, but more one of how perspective and projection work in the real world. Isometric "perspective" is, strictly spoken, already wrong, but looks realistic enough if you assume a very flat angle from a distance, so people have seen something roughly like it in real life, and don't really notice it's wrong.

Your mixed-isometric tiles look fine right now because you only have the one building, and it is in the middle, but real perspective gets smaller toward the back, and if you have angled buildings in the back that are the same size, it'll look wrong anyway, and if you can side-scroll, it'll be even more wrong, because usually buildings on the right have only their left walls visible, and buildings on the left only their right walls.

Just try it. No technical reason not to do it, it just starts looking too unrealistic, or subtly weird, if you mix perspectives. Can be useful as a fun Inception-style effect though.

If your curious about why this is this way, you may want to get a book about perspective drawing from the local art supplies store.

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