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I can't remember where I first heard it, but that's an old rule of thumb that doesn't hold up to much critical thought. Truly, it comes down to business objectives. If you don't plan on selling the game, it doesn't matter.

The fact is, the more hardware you can support the bigger your potential market is. However, most independent developers aren't going to have the resources to support anywhere near cutting edge hardware anyway, because in order to take advantage of said hardware they're going to have to expend a fair amount on content. Any independent developer that needs to worry about that also probablyusually has the resources to find out what system specs they shouldneed to target, and that's likely something you'd have to pay forinformation you can buy. Steam, for example, probably collects that kind of datathose statistics and likely resells it to developers.

I can't remember where I first heard it, but that's an old rule of thumb that doesn't hold up to much critical thought. Truly, it comes down to business objectives. If you don't plan on selling the game, it doesn't matter.

The fact is, the more hardware you can support the bigger your potential market is. However, most independent developers aren't going to have the resources to support anywhere near cutting edge hardware anyway, because in order to take advantage of said hardware they're going to have to expend a fair amount on content. Any independent developer that needs to worry about that also probably has the resources to find out what system specs they should target, and that's likely something you'd have to pay for. Steam, for example, probably collects that kind of data and resells it to developers.

I can't remember where I first heard it, but that's an old rule of thumb that doesn't hold up to much critical thought. Truly, it comes down to business objectives. If you don't plan on selling the game, it doesn't matter.

The fact is, the more hardware you can support the bigger your potential market is. However, most independent developers aren't going to have the resources to support anywhere near cutting edge hardware anyway, because in order to take advantage of said hardware they're going to have to expend a fair amount on content. Any independent developer that needs to worry about that usually has the resources to find out what system specs they need to target, and that's likely information you can buy. Steam, for example, collects those statistics and likely resells it to developers.

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source | link

I can't remember where I first heard it, but that's an old rule of thumb that doesn't hold up to much critical thought. Truly, it comes down to business objectives. If you don't plan on selling the game, it doesn't matter.

The fact is, the more hardware you can support the bigger your potential market is. However, most independent developers aren't going to have the resources to support anywhere near cutting edge hardware anyway, because in order to take advantage of said hardware they're going to have to expend a fair amount on content. Any independent developer that needs to worry about that also probably has the resources to find out what system specs they should target, and that's likely something you'd have to pay for. Steam, for example, probably collects that kind of data and resells it to developers.