3 Clarify formula.
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You can use the parametric equation as marked by Krom. To understand why we used this formula you have to understand what the equation is. This equation is derived from the Parametric equation of circle.

Considering the circle is drawn with the center on the origin (O) as shown in the diagram below Circle

If we take a point "p" on the circumference of the circle, having a radius r.

Let the angle made by OP (Origin to p) be θ. Let the distance of p from x-axis be y Let the distance of p from y-axis be x

Using the above assumptions we get the triangle as shown below : triangle

Now we know that cos θ = base/hypotenuse and sin θ = perpendicular/hypotenuse

which gives us cos θ = x/r and sin θ = y/r

:: x=rcosx=r*cos θ and y=rsiny=r*sin θ

But if the circle is not at the origin and rather at (a,b) then we can say that the center of the circle is shifted

a units in x axis
b units in y axis
So for such a circle we can change the parametric equation accordingly by adding the shift on the x and y axis giving us the following equations :

x=a+rcosx=a+(r*cos θ)
y=b+rsiny=b+(r*sin θ)


Where a & b are the x,y co-ordinates of the center of the circle.

Hence we found x and y the co-ordinates of the point on the circumference of the circle with radius r

You can use the parametric equation as marked by Krom. To understand why we used this formula you have to understand what the equation is. This equation is derived from the Parametric equation of circle.

Considering the circle is drawn with the center on the origin (O) as shown in the diagram below Circle

If we take a point "p" on the circumference of the circle, having a radius r.

Let the angle made by OP (Origin to p) be θ. Let the distance of p from x-axis be y Let the distance of p from y-axis be x

Using the above assumptions we get the triangle as shown below : triangle

Now we know that cos θ = base/hypotenuse and sin θ = perpendicular/hypotenuse

which gives us cos θ = x/r and sin θ = y/r

:: x=rcos θ and y=rsin θ

But if the circle is not at the origin and rather at (a,b) then we can say that the center of the circle is shifted

a units in x axis
b units in y axis
So for such a circle we can change the parametric equation accordingly by adding the shift on the x and y axis giving us the following equations :

x=a+rcos θ
y=b+rsin θ


Where a & b are the x,y co-ordinates of the center of the circle.

Hence we found x and y the co-ordinates of the point on the circumference of the circle with radius r

You can use the parametric equation as marked by Krom. To understand why we used this formula you have to understand what the equation is. This equation is derived from the Parametric equation of circle.

Considering the circle is drawn with the center on the origin (O) as shown in the diagram below Circle

If we take a point "p" on the circumference of the circle, having a radius r.

Let the angle made by OP (Origin to p) be θ. Let the distance of p from x-axis be y Let the distance of p from y-axis be x

Using the above assumptions we get the triangle as shown below : triangle

Now we know that cos θ = base/hypotenuse and sin θ = perpendicular/hypotenuse

which gives us cos θ = x/r and sin θ = y/r

:: x=r*cos θ and y=r*sin θ

But if the circle is not at the origin and rather at (a,b) then we can say that the center of the circle is shifted

a units in x axis
b units in y axis
So for such a circle we can change the parametric equation accordingly by adding the shift on the x and y axis giving us the following equations :

x=a+(r*cos θ)
y=b+(r*sin θ)


Where a & b are the x,y co-ordinates of the center of the circle.

Hence we found x and y the co-ordinates of the point on the circumference of the circle with radius r

2 clarify meaning
source | link

You can use the parametric equation as marked by Krom. To understand why we used this formula you have to understand what the equation is. This equation is derived from the Parametric equation of circle.

Considering the circle is drawn with the center on the origin (O) as shown in the diagram below Circle

If we take a point "p" on the circumference of the circle, having a radius r.

Let the angle made by OP (Origin to p) be θ. Let the distance of p from x-axis be y Let the distance of p from y-axis be x

Using the above assumptions we get the triangle as shown below : triangle

Now we know that cos θ = base/hypotenuse and sin θ = perpendicular/hypotenuse

which gives us cos θ = x/r and sin θ = y/r

:: x=rcos θ and y=rsin θ

But if the circle is not at the origin and rather at (a,b) then we can say that the center of the circle is shifted

a units in x axis
b units in y axis
So for such a circle we can change the parametric equation accordingly by adding the shift on the x and y axis giving us the following equations :

x=a+rcos θ
y=b+rsin θ


Where a & b are the x,y co-ordinates of the center of the circle.

Hence we found x and y the co-ordinates of the point on the circumference of the circle with radius r

You can use the parametric equation as marked by Krom. To understand why we used this formula you have to understand what the equation is. This equation is derived from the Parametric equation of circle.

Considering the circle is drawn on the origin (O) as shown in the diagram below Circle

If we take a point "p" on the circumference of the circle, having a radius r.

Let the angle made by OP (Origin to p) be θ. Let the distance of p from x-axis be y Let the distance of p from y-axis be x

Using the above assumptions we get the triangle as shown below : triangle

Now we know that cos θ = base/hypotenuse and sin θ = perpendicular/hypotenuse

which gives us cos θ = x/r and sin θ = y/r

:: x=rcos θ and y=rsin θ

But if the circle is not at the origin and rather at (a,b) then we can say that the center of the circle is shifted

a units in x axis
b units in y axis
So for such a circle we can change the parametric equation accordingly by adding the shift on the x and y axis giving us the following equations :

x=a+rcos θ
y=b+rsin θ


Where a & b are the x,y co-ordinates of the center of the circle.

Hence we found x and y the co-ordinates of the point on the circumference of the circle with radius r

You can use the parametric equation as marked by Krom. To understand why we used this formula you have to understand what the equation is. This equation is derived from the Parametric equation of circle.

Considering the circle is drawn with the center on the origin (O) as shown in the diagram below Circle

If we take a point "p" on the circumference of the circle, having a radius r.

Let the angle made by OP (Origin to p) be θ. Let the distance of p from x-axis be y Let the distance of p from y-axis be x

Using the above assumptions we get the triangle as shown below : triangle

Now we know that cos θ = base/hypotenuse and sin θ = perpendicular/hypotenuse

which gives us cos θ = x/r and sin θ = y/r

:: x=rcos θ and y=rsin θ

But if the circle is not at the origin and rather at (a,b) then we can say that the center of the circle is shifted

a units in x axis
b units in y axis
So for such a circle we can change the parametric equation accordingly by adding the shift on the x and y axis giving us the following equations :

x=a+rcos θ
y=b+rsin θ


Where a & b are the x,y co-ordinates of the center of the circle.

Hence we found x and y the co-ordinates of the point on the circumference of the circle with radius r

1
source | link

You can use the parametric equation as marked by Krom. To understand why we used this formula you have to understand what the equation is. This equation is derived from the Parametric equation of circle.

Considering the circle is drawn on the origin (O) as shown in the diagram below Circle

If we take a point "p" on the circumference of the circle, having a radius r.

Let the angle made by OP (Origin to p) be θ. Let the distance of p from x-axis be y Let the distance of p from y-axis be x

Using the above assumptions we get the triangle as shown below : triangle

Now we know that cos θ = base/hypotenuse and sin θ = perpendicular/hypotenuse

which gives us cos θ = x/r and sin θ = y/r

:: x=rcos θ and y=rsin θ

But if the circle is not at the origin and rather at (a,b) then we can say that the center of the circle is shifted

a units in x axis
b units in y axis
So for such a circle we can change the parametric equation accordingly by adding the shift on the x and y axis giving us the following equations :

x=a+rcos θ
y=b+rsin θ


Where a & b are the x,y co-ordinates of the center of the circle.

Hence we found x and y the co-ordinates of the point on the circumference of the circle with radius r