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There are several decimation algorithms you can implement, here is the original paper on decimation. But as you said non of them are mainstream, or even easy to implement.

I would say your best bet is to check OpenMesh's decimation framework, they have a policy based C++ implementation of decimation algorithms, so you can try different policies based on the criteria you need. I have on-hand experience with it and I would say they got impressive results, maintaining the general shape and the attributes of the vertices. The only drawback I can think of is that they use half-edge data structure, so unless it's a pre-process it might not be practical to use in your game.

They also have an editor where you can try it without even bothering with code.

There are several decimation algorithms you can implement, here is the original paper on decimation. But as you said non of them are mainstream, or even easy to implement.

I would say your best bet is to check OpenMesh's decimation framework, they have a policy based C++ implementation of decimation algorithms, so you can try different policies based on the criteria you need. I have on-hand experience with it and I would say they got impressive results, the only drawback I can think of is that they use half-edge data structure, so unless it's a pre-process it might not be practical to use in your game.

They also have an editor where you can try it without even bothering with code.

There are several decimation algorithms you can implement, here is the original paper on decimation. But as you said non of them are mainstream, or even easy to implement.

I would say your best bet is to check OpenMesh's decimation framework, they have a policy based C++ implementation of decimation algorithms, so you can try different policies based on the criteria you need. I have on-hand experience with it and I would say they got impressive results maintaining the general shape and the attributes of the vertices. The only drawback I can think of is that they use half-edge data structure, so unless it's a pre-process it might not be practical to use in your game.

They also have an editor where you can try it without even bothering with code.

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source | link

There are several decimation algorithms you can implement, here is the original paper on decimation. But as you said non of them are mainstream, or even easy to implement.

I would say your best bet is to check OpenMesh's decimation framework, they have a policy based C++ implementation of decimation algorithms, so you can try different policies based on the criteria you need. I have on-hand experience with it and I would say they got impressive results, the only drawback I can think of is that they use half-edge data structure, so unless it's a pre-process it might not be practical to use in your game.

They also have an editor where you can try it without even bothering with code.