2 update a false prediction about IE; formatting and phrasing updates
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1) Framerate varies by browser. Some still do not support accelerated canvas rendering, others don't support WebGL at all. Best bet is to profile actual code on actual target hardware/browsers.

2) WebGL is not supported by IE, probably never will be. WebGL support is often blacklisted on machines with older hardware or drivers where canvas should still work. WebGL is not a technology you should bet a commercial venture on at this time. (Note that I have shipped a commercial WebGL game; WebGL support issues were a huge problem.)

3) Almost no mobile browsers in the wild support WebGL. They almost all support canvas.

4) Cnavas is around to stay. So is WebGL. Neither is more future proof than the other.

  1. Framerate varies by browser. A few still do not support accelerated canvas rendering, others don't support WebGL at all. Best bet is to profile actual code on actual target hardware/browsers to determine which performs best for your specific needs and user demographics.

  2. WebGL is only supported on IE in version 11+ but canvas has been supported for several versions. Consider the current market share of older versions of IE.

  3. WebGL support is sometimes blacklisted by the browser on older hardware or drivers. When it comes to support, you need to consider this in addition to the minimum browser versions, and clearly communicate these requirements to customers.

  4. Few mobile browsers support WebGL today. They mostly all support canvas.

  5. Both canvas and WebGL are around to stay. Neither is more future proof than the other.

1) Framerate varies by browser. Some still do not support accelerated canvas rendering, others don't support WebGL at all. Best bet is to profile actual code on actual target hardware/browsers.

2) WebGL is not supported by IE, probably never will be. WebGL support is often blacklisted on machines with older hardware or drivers where canvas should still work. WebGL is not a technology you should bet a commercial venture on at this time. (Note that I have shipped a commercial WebGL game; WebGL support issues were a huge problem.)

3) Almost no mobile browsers in the wild support WebGL. They almost all support canvas.

4) Cnavas is around to stay. So is WebGL. Neither is more future proof than the other.

  1. Framerate varies by browser. A few still do not support accelerated canvas rendering, others don't support WebGL at all. Best bet is to profile actual code on actual target hardware/browsers to determine which performs best for your specific needs and user demographics.

  2. WebGL is only supported on IE in version 11+ but canvas has been supported for several versions. Consider the current market share of older versions of IE.

  3. WebGL support is sometimes blacklisted by the browser on older hardware or drivers. When it comes to support, you need to consider this in addition to the minimum browser versions, and clearly communicate these requirements to customers.

  4. Few mobile browsers support WebGL today. They mostly all support canvas.

  5. Both canvas and WebGL are around to stay. Neither is more future proof than the other.

1
source | link

1) Framerate varies by browser. Some still do not support accelerated canvas rendering, others don't support WebGL at all. Best bet is to profile actual code on actual target hardware/browsers.

2) WebGL is not supported by IE, probably never will be. WebGL support is often blacklisted on machines with older hardware or drivers where canvas should still work. WebGL is not a technology you should bet a commercial venture on at this time. (Note that I have shipped a commercial WebGL game; WebGL support issues were a huge problem.)

3) Almost no mobile browsers in the wild support WebGL. They almost all support canvas.

4) Cnavas is around to stay. So is WebGL. Neither is more future proof than the other.