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I think the only thing you can possibly get from this question is personal opinions, so bear in mind that the choice is entirely up to you. With that said, I'll speak for myself, and from my own experience, because I've been through both types of classes before, although there's no guarantee that the rewards you'll get from your classes were the same I got from mine.

My opinion is that, if your game design class is just going to be a "learn on your own with a deadline to motivate you" class, then you might as well just do that on your own and take the course on graphics programming instead, since that one should at least teach you some concrete techniques. It depends on how much you think you're capable of motivating yourself at home.

I've learnt a lot from working on projects for university courses, but now that I'm about finished with my degree, I look back and can't help but feel that the projects I did for those courses, I might as well have done them at home for my own personal gain. On the other hand, the most technical courses, like the one I had on graphics programming, were probably the most useful of the bunch.

So, if you aren't usually capable of motivating and challenging yourself with personal projects, you might want to take the game design course to force you into working on something. Otherwise, I'd go with the graphical programming course, which should increase your personal "toolbox".

The bottom line is, to learn how to make a game, you'll need to get your hands dirty and actually start working on one. But if you really enjoy game development, then you shouldn't need to take a course just to force you to work on one. In that perspective, you should probably invest on the course that actually gives you new knowledge, as opposed to the one that just "forces you to work".

I think the only thing you can possibly get from this question is personal opinions, so bear in mind that the choice is entirely up to you. With that said, I'll speak for myself, and from my own experience, because I've been through both types of classes before, although there's no guarantee that the rewards you'll get from your classes were the same I got from mine.

My opinion is that, if your game design class is just going to be a "learn on your own with a deadline to motivate you" class, then you might as well just do that on your own and take the course on graphics programming instead, since that one should at least teach you some concrete techniques. It depends on how much you think you're capable of motivating yourself at home.

I've learnt a lot from working on projects for university courses, but now that I'm about finished with my degree, I look back and can't help but feel that the projects I did for those courses, I might as well have done them at home for my own personal gain. On the other hand, the most technical courses, like the one I had on graphics programming, were probably the most useful of the bunch.

So, if you aren't usually capable of motivating and challenging yourself with personal projects, you might want to take the game design course to force you into working on something. Otherwise, I'd go with the graphical programming course, which should increase your personal "toolbox".

I think the only thing you can possibly get from this question is personal opinions, so bear in mind that the choice is entirely up to you. With that said, I'll speak for myself, and from my own experience, because I've been through both types of classes before, although there's no guarantee that the rewards you'll get from your classes were the same I got from mine.

My opinion is that, if your game design class is just going to be a "learn on your own with a deadline to motivate you" class, then you might as well just do that on your own and take the course on graphics programming instead, since that one should at least teach you some concrete techniques. It depends on how much you think you're capable of motivating yourself at home.

I've learnt a lot from working on projects for university courses, but now that I'm about finished with my degree, I look back and can't help but feel that the projects I did for those courses, I might as well have done them at home for my own personal gain. On the other hand, the most technical courses, like the one I had on graphics programming, were probably the most useful of the bunch.

So, if you aren't usually capable of motivating and challenging yourself with personal projects, you might want to take the game design course to force you into working on something. Otherwise, I'd go with the graphical programming course, which should increase your personal "toolbox".

The bottom line is, to learn how to make a game, you'll need to get your hands dirty and actually start working on one. But if you really enjoy game development, then you shouldn't need to take a course just to force you to work on one. In that perspective, you should probably invest on the course that actually gives you new knowledge, as opposed to the one that just "forces you to work".

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source | link

I think the only thing you can possibly get from this question is personal opinions, so bear in mind that the choice is entirely up to you. With that said, I'll speak for myself, and from my own experience, because I've been through both types of classes before, although there's no guarantee that the rewards you'll get from your classes were the same I got from mine.

My opinion is that, if your game design class is just going to be a "learn on your own with a deadline to motivate you" class, then you might as well just do that on your own and take the course on graphics programming instead, since that one should at least teach you some concrete techniques. It depends on how much you think you're capable of motivating yourself at home.

I've learnt a lot from working on projects for university courses, but now that I'm about finished with my degree, I look back and can't help but feel that the projects I did for those courses, I might as well have done them at home for my own personal gain. On the other hand, the most technical courses, like the one I had on graphics programming, were probably the most useful of the bunch.

So, if you aren't usually capable of motivating and challenging yourself with personal projects, you might want to take the game design course to force you into working on something. Otherwise, I'd go with the graphical programming course, which should increase your personal "toolbox".