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It depends. If you are not saving / loading the game often, then using an image for your save file isn't likely to be a barrier in terms of speed. On theethe other hand, if you are frequently doing automatic quick saves or check pointing, it may be a problem.

One advantage to your approach is that depending on the level size, it may give your players a fun & easy way to trade save game data. I don't recall the title, but there was some game that deliberately made the save game file a small thumbnail image of the level itself. Players could get a sense of what the level looked like at a glance, show off & trade levels on social media by posting the images & potentially edit the levels themselves with paint or photoshop (though not all such level might be valid).

The game MidBoss did something similar:

When a MidBoss player finishes a run—usually by dying—they can post a "death card" with the circumstances of their death or transcendence to Twitter. The embedded image doubles as a save files to allow other players to replay from the same seed or salvage loot from the failed run, since all of the information is steganographically encoded into the PNG image file.

Similarly, TerraTech and Spore used steganography & image files for sharing player-generated content.

I realize the original question isn't about steganography per say - my point is that using a format that is readily understandable by players & can be used outside your game may have benefits.

It depends. If you are not saving / loading the game often, then using an image for your save file isn't likely to be a barrier in terms of speed. On thee other hand, if you are frequently doing automatic quick saves or check pointing, it may be a problem.

One advantage to your approach is that depending on the level size, it may give your players a fun & easy way to trade save game data. I don't recall the title, but there was some game that deliberately made the save game file a small thumbnail image of the level itself. Players could get a sense of what the level looked like at a glance, show off & trade levels on social media by posting the images & potentially edit the levels themselves with paint or photoshop (though not all such level might be valid).

It depends. If you are not saving / loading the game often, then using an image for your save file isn't likely to be a barrier in terms of speed. On the other hand, if you are frequently doing automatic quick saves or check pointing, it may be a problem.

One advantage to your approach is that depending on the level size, it may give your players a fun & easy way to trade save game data. I don't recall the title, but there was some game that deliberately made the save game file a small thumbnail image of the level itself. Players could get a sense of what the level looked like at a glance, show off & trade levels on social media by posting the images & potentially edit the levels themselves with paint or photoshop (though not all such level might be valid).

The game MidBoss did something similar:

When a MidBoss player finishes a run—usually by dying—they can post a "death card" with the circumstances of their death or transcendence to Twitter. The embedded image doubles as a save files to allow other players to replay from the same seed or salvage loot from the failed run, since all of the information is steganographically encoded into the PNG image file.

Similarly, TerraTech and Spore used steganography & image files for sharing player-generated content.

I realize the original question isn't about steganography per say - my point is that using a format that is readily understandable by players & can be used outside your game may have benefits.

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source | link

It depends. If you are not saving / loading the game often, then using an image for your save file isn't likely to be a barrier in terms of speed. On thee other hand, if you are frequently doing automatic quick saves or check pointing, it may be a problem.

One advantage to your approach is that depending on the level size, it may give your players a fun & easy way to trade save game data. I don't recall the title, but there was some game that deliberately made the save game file a small thumbnail image of the level itself. Players could get a sense of what the level looked like at a glance, show off & trade levels on social media by posting the images & potentially edit the levels themselves with paint or photoshop (though not all such level might be valid).