530 reputation
516
bio website thegamecoder.com/blog
location India
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 13 hours ago

Twitter: @ApoorvaJ


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
5
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
18
revised Creating UI using Flixel
Changed the title. User UI is redundant.
Feb
18
suggested suggested edit on Creating UI using Flixel
Jan
16
comment Keeping Aspect Screen Ratio While Stays in Center
@DavidDimalanta Yes. Scale to fit and then crop the rest.
Dec
16
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
16
accepted What percentage of development time should I spend in balancing?
Sep
12
awarded  Yearling
Aug
30
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
17
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
18
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
8
comment Keeping Aspect Screen Ratio While Stays in Center
@TredeciesNocturne , I think this deserves a separate question. The short answer is viewers (at least on mobile platforms) want an aspect ratio that their device has. This means no visible black bars or offset margins. This is perfectly possible to do on most kinds of games. In summary, the implementation can vary. The most important thing is to keep the scaling process unnoticable to the user.
Dec
20
awarded  Good Question
Dec
11
comment Rendering scaled-down card images
@user1065145 The old style windows card you linked to has been done in pixel art. That's the best way to get detail in small resolutions, one pixel at a time.
Dec
9
revised 2D Smooth Turning in a Tile-Based Game
Corrected the second formula
Dec
9
suggested suggested edit on 2D Smooth Turning in a Tile-Based Game
Dec
9
comment 2D Smooth Turning in a Tile-Based Game
And also change the (ball_position - circle_center) to its reverse. That way the acceleration vector points to the turn corner and not away from it.
Dec
9
comment 2D Smooth Turning in a Tile-Based Game
I do use a physics engine and hence went for method 2. There are a few mistakes in your equation, but it pointed me in the right direction (Uniform Circular Motion). The correct equation would be: acceleration = (circle_center - ball_position).Normalize() * (ball_velocity.Length() ^ 2) / circle_radius. This code is derived from the equation for centripetal acceleration whose magnitude is given by: a = v^2 / r, and direction is from the object to the center of circular motion.
Dec
9
accepted 2D Smooth Turning in a Tile-Based Game
Dec
8
asked 2D Smooth Turning in a Tile-Based Game