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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Jun 7 '13 at 21:00

Jun
8
accepted Access violation in DirectX OMSetRenderTargets
Jun
8
answered Access violation in DirectX OMSetRenderTargets
Oct
7
awarded  Editor
Oct
2
comment Access violation in DirectX OMSetRenderTargets
I have, and there's not a single warning.
Oct
2
comment Access violation in DirectX OMSetRenderTargets
Tried that, to no avail. The render target was not NULL and seemed to be perfectly valid. Setting it to NULL actually resolves the error message, but results in nothing being drawn (except the blue background).
Oct
1
asked Access violation in DirectX OMSetRenderTargets
Jun
6
awarded  Teacher
Jun
5
accepted Collisions between players at spawnpoints
Jun
5
comment Does XNA provide any special class to make a game server?
You could use the System.Thread.Sleep(time) to update something at a fixed interval of time, and create your own server-side game loop manually
Jun
5
asked Collisions between players at spawnpoints
Jun
5
answered Does XNA provide any special class to make a game server?
May
29
comment Peer-to-peer first person shooter
I've also spent several months on protocols such as these tweaking the performance so that they can even run on slow netbooks (yes, I have tested on netbooks, running both Ubuntu Linux, and Windows 7 starter)
May
29
comment Peer-to-peer first person shooter
as the most up-to-date version.
May
29
comment Peer-to-peer first person shooter
Both peers end up caching information about each other, and provide it to other peers when necessary. We use patented algorithms to perform this procedure, as well as the protocol which is "patent pending" right now. There's obviously a huge number of optimizations, and cached data is deleted once it is detected that it's no longer needed, and/or the peer is running low on resources needed to play the game at a high speed. There's also various "access controls" on the system which identify which peer "owns" the data, and information like this can be used to determine which peer can get it
May
29
comment Peer-to-peer first person shooter
How it works is each router in the network (which is guaranteed to be reachable from any peer) stores data about any peer which connects to it. The peer will then send a query to the router, asking it for information about other peers that tried to connect to it, and also if it is bound to any of the same services as it. If it is bound to one or more of the same services, it establishes an XStream to the router. Then it connects to any peers it deems necessary (which it found by looking at information from the router) in order to find more information about the state of the system.
May
29
comment Peer-to-peer first person shooter
I used the same proprietary technology which we used for developing our distributed filesystem. We're primarily a networking company, just getting into gaming, so we've already worked on things like this. I already have a patent on a protocol which does this, bypasses firewalls, and creates at least 2 backups of each file on our system as soon as it is updated. I'll explain more about how this works in the next comment, as I'm running out of room for this one.
May
29
awarded  Commentator
May
29
awarded  Scholar
May
29
awarded  Supporter
May
29
comment Peer-to-peer first person shooter
Great idea! Implemented this in the engine just now and it works great, even on the load simulations!