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May
4
awarded  Guru
Apr
30
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
30
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
@LorenPechtel Well, how are you going to know when they are sleeping? There's plenty of people with very unusual sleep schedules out there. Just because they didn't answer doesn't mean it was a bot, maybe they just didn't feel like answering then and decided to do it later. As for language, presumably the player speaks the language the game is in, otherwise how would they agree to the rules or ToS? Not that it's hard to distinguish bot from foreigner in a conversation.
Apr
30
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
@Alomvar I'm glad it was helpful. Since the question got so many votes, you might as well put a link to your game in your profile :)
Apr
30
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
@Random832 The guy with no job can be seen as justly rewarded for his dedication, so at least it seems fair. Bots though are seen as blatant cheating: Anyone can download and run a bot, so the player reaction is more like when Mr. Moneybags rides in a cash shop game and buys his way to the top.
Apr
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
28
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
@Polan Not a problem if writing the bot is more fun than playing in the first place.
Apr
28
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
The problem with messages is that a botter could easily be logging in to play every day, and running the bot on the same account to take care of the busywork. The bot would ignore the message, the human would reply the next morning, and it's hard to punish a player for replying a few hours too late to a message sent in the middle of the night.
Apr
28
answered How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
Apr
28
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
While I agree with the spirit of this, unfortunately the premise that you can make the game not tedious is a fallacy. What if there 10,000 of your players love mechanic X, but 10 find it tedious and write bots, ruining the fun of the 10,000? This is what happens with aimbots in FPSs: The analogous solution would be to make aiming matter less, but a lot of players love perfecting their aiming skills. It's only a few that feel the need to aimbot.
Apr
28
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
The main reason people use bots is because parts of the game are tedious and boring for them (if they were fun they would just play them). Clearly your players are enjoying the competition and challenge, but not the automatable gameplay. You could try changing game design to remove the parts that people use bots to get over, or re-balance your game to create more difficult and meaningful decisions that only a human player can make, and a bot cannot (such as deep strategic choices). Otherwise, you'll be doomed to an arms race, and the botters will win.
Apr
28
comment How to detect and prevent abuse (botting) of online game API?
While these ideas are clever, they are not only easy to defeat, but I would be tempted to write a bot simply because it seems so fun to defeat them, even if I didn't care much about doing well in the game.
Apr
21
comment When prototyping, how can I more easily explore game behaviour?
I think what you are doing is formally called "unit testing", especially if you want to tweak a small part of the game at a time. Unfortunately, games are hard to actually unit test, because it's hard to isolate components and hard to automate the test itself (so that it can decide on pass/fail). Reading about unit testing strategies might give you useful ideas, though.
Apr
21
comment When prototyping, how can I more easily explore game behaviour?
@JonasByström I don't know about him, but when I have good control over my game states, I can often have alternative "Debug" versions (often literal IF DEBUG compiler directives) that go straight to my "testing" state (skipping the game menu etc.), which is just a bare bones play area with whatever assets I'm testing at the time. So I basically compile an alternate executable that automatically loads a very stripped down level (less assets to load+no mucking about with game menu every time).
Apr
21
comment When prototyping, how can I more easily explore game behaviour?
That's a very nice picture. Where is it from?
Feb
6
awarded  Yearling
Jan
2
awarded  Explainer
Jan
2
revised How can I make A* finish faster when the destination is impassable?
The title is pretty general and vague, but the body of question has specifics.
Jan
2
suggested approved edit on How can I make A* finish faster when the destination is impassable?
Jan
2
answered How can I make A* finish faster when the destination is impassable?