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25

I don't have any stats to compare the differences between XNA and non-XNA game sales - I'd suggest that data is impossible to come by - but I imagine it would show there is no difference for equivalent games. So let me answer your question with a run through of the major issues specific to distribution of XNA games on PC (particularly online): First of ...


23

In short, the most usable 3D game engines written in fully managed C# code (which allows you to develop for the Windows and Xbox 360) are: Ox Game Engine - a 3d version of the ButterMilk 2d engine - excellent features, Jiggle physics, reasonable scene editor, shadows. Free. SunBurn - AAA rendering with dynamic lighting & shadowing, occulusion, HDR ...


17

"The non-commercial Kinect SDK for Windows will be released this spring, Microsoft said, and a commercial version is planned for a later date. The company said the SDKs will include support for audio, the Kinect API and direct control of the sensor." That being said, if you don't want to wait, there's a lot of work being done on several fronts with ...


15

Somewhere between $20M and $100M would be reasonable depending on genre for a AAA game. XBLA/PSN downloadable games often cost much less, and people have made XBLIG games for a few hundred dollars in their spare time. As a recent example, APB was rumored to have cost $100M (MMOs are among the most expensive games to produce).


15

Yes, different platforms run different .net runtimes. The way this works in xna 3/3.1/4 is you create your game project for a single platform (say, create a new Windows Xna game project in visual studio). In visual studios 'solution explorer', right click the project and then chooses 'create copy of project for X', where x is the platform you want the new ...


15

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: You almost certainly aren't ready for that, and a sole developer would be folly to undertake such an enormous project anyway. Connecting to a common server is not too big of an issue. All the devices you mention communicate with common servers on a regular basis (via HTTP anyway). The server doesn't have to know anything ...


14

The short answer: Yes. XNA is just a tool. It is suitable for all but the most processor- and graphically-intensive games. If you are considering XNA for an Xbox 360 game, here's what you will miss out on: Access to the SIMD/Vector unit for doing really, really fast CPU floating point maths Ability to use native language code that will probably be a ...


14

Your dilemma hints at a larger problem that's well-known to the graphics programming community, commonly referred to as "combinatorial shader explosion." As the name implies, it's usually considered in the context of very large numbers of shader permutations, but the basic principle is the same. Solutions geared toward solving the overarching problem are ...


14

You have to keep in mind that the Xbox360 has far poorer .NET performance than your average desktop PC (and a limited subset of it too!). There are two main reasons: the Load/Hit/Store penalty (due to the architecture of the CPU/RAM/GPU) and the non-generational Garbage Collector. For GC issues, which cause 'pauses' or 'freezes' in your game during ...


13

As a gamer, I appreciate it when games use the following conventions: I press Start to pause the game. Unless it has some special function (like bringing up a secondary menu), I want the B button to unpause the game. Same goes for Start button. I want to move the selection with either the left thumbstick or the D-pad, and I want the selection to wrap. ie: ...


12

Basicly, the xbox 360 has 6 hardware threads, spread over 3 cores. Two of these are reserved for the xna framework and general system use. Threading works the same as it does on the .net framework on windows,except you get an extra methods, SetProcessorAffinity. Unlike windows, the xbox dosnt do any fancy thread scheduling for you, so you have to tell it ...


12

Yes and no. Officially, the only thing you can use on the 360 with XNA is C#. You can't ship any unmanaged DLLs with an app on xbox live, and if you want to write your game in C, you need a dev kit and an impossible-to-get contract with Redmond. That said, anything you can compile into CIL that will run on the compact framework will be okay. If you can ...


12

If you want to develop native games for 360/PS3, there is no alternative to getting a Devkit. Consoles are more than just a CPU. It's graphics card, OS, memory, File-System, SDKs and a lot more. If your idea is to port later, thats not gonna work as easy as getting a more less similar machine in terms of its specs. The entire environment is different to a ...


12

Well, I know on Xbox LIVE Indie Games, they have certain standards that they want you to follow. For example, they recommend that your game can run with a transfer speed of 8kb/s. This is because many people own Xboxes and not all of them have high-speed connections or even live in places where high-speed internet is available (what a nightmare! :-) ). So, ...


11

Unless you are willing to pay $10,000 for an XBOX or Playstation devkit, then the only console you can develop for is the XBOX 360, and the only way you can do it is with XNA. For professional development, unless you really need to get 100% of the processing power of the XBOX (which most games, especially 2D games do not need), then XNA in my opinion is ...


11

It should work pretty easy. I'm using an xbox 360 controller plugged into my windows machine as my main gaming controller, and to make an XNA project use it all I had to do was: GamePadState gamepadState = GamePad.GetState(PlayerIndex.One); float movement = gamePadState.ThumbSticks.Left.X * MoveStickScale; if (Math.Abs(movement) < 0.5f) ...


11

Post it everywhere you can; Steam, Desura... Head over to the Business section of http://tigsource.com forum. Send to this page too to also publish it on cover. Send also to http://indiegames.com/index.html It is a good way to advertise.


11

You can commercially release games on the xbox as a live indie game with the express version. I believe you can release PC games too. The xbox you develop on does need a hard-drive. You need (at least) a silver Xbox LIVE account (free). You do need an app hub account. Note, i'm quoting parts of an EULA, but i'm not a lawyer, this is my interpretation of ...


11

In XNA there is a SignedInGamer class with a SignedInGamer.PlayerIndex member that should tell you just that if you can get a hold of the SignedInGamer object. To do that, there is the Gamer.SignedInGamers static property which contains a collection of SignedInGamer objects based on the current state of the system. This is from the ...


10

For commercial console game development, setting up a build system to target 360, PC, and PS3 simultaneously is irritating but is not particularly difficult. The 360 dev kit is simply a new a new target for Visual Studio + some tools and uses a very similar compiler to the standard windows MSVC++ compiler. The PS3 uses a GCC compiler back end but plugs ...


10

Data transfer over LAN or Internet There are two types of online multiplayer games available when you create a networked game with XNA Game Studio: System link game sessions (LAN) LIVE sessions. (Internet) Session types available: Use System Link for Local Area Network gameplay Sign in to Xbox LIVE and Games for Windows - LIVE Servers Use LIVE to ...


10

Neat idea for the game. The problem is that light really doesn't look like this. Light decay is NOT gausian :). That's for the begining. What i want to propose is adding simple (but relatively physicaly correct) fog or dust. Mean volumetric effect. You will have to implement volumetric raycasting on the gpu. Don't panic. It is not that hard as it might ...


10

You will be able to read and write from any flat file (XML, JSON to name two), you can also use SQLite with XNA 4.0 Here are some samples from microsoft


10

Most production level game engines have what is known as a Hardware Abstraction Layer. This is a generic API that the game engine can use to talk with hardware with out having to know which hardware that is. They just call SoundManager.PlaySFX(SFX_ID) or the like. Underneath in the sound manager however it will know which hardware its actually working on and ...


10

The best way is to periodically test the game in a console to check for performance problems or problematic garbage collections; otherwise you will end with a lengthy debugging and optimization session before publishing the game. And when porting to Xbox 360, check all the cases specified in the peer review evil checklist.


9

Depending on your location and how awesome an office and benefits you're looking at, (in the US) you can count on $8,000 to $15,000 per developer per month. This is the fully loaded cost and includes IT and HR costs as well as equipment and other infrastructure. For $8000 per person-month, though, you're going to be in a pretty crappy warehouse on the ...


9

http://www.computerandvideogames.com/article.php?id=258873?cid=OTC-RSS&attr=CVG-News-RSS Looks like for the moment it's only for select Microsoft partners.


8

First of all - let me say - I have done exactly this (developing on PC and then porting to Xbox 360 late in development) and had only minimal trouble. With XNA 4.0 and the introduction of the profiles (HiDef is what you want to target for the 360) it has become significantly easier to keep within the specifications of the Xbox. You basically need to ...



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