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57

EDIT: It's official, Microsoft has killed off XNA. I'm saddened by this but it was not unexpected, it's what I was predicting would happen, but hoping I was wrong. Everything below this point is my original post from early 2012. Something else to consider is that Microsoft is likely to release a new console in mid to late 2013. Will they continue with ...


52

Microsoft has an FAQ about the use of their trademark. From that FAQ: Can I use a Microsoft logo to indicate that my product or service runs on or is compatible with a Microsoft technology or service? Yes, as long as you have a signed logo license agreement with Microsoft. Microsoft has many logo programs to indicate compatibility with ...


40

MonoGame ( an OpenSource, OpenGL implementation of XNA ) v2.5 was released today with support for custom shaders across iOS, Android, MacOS and Linux. Our team has started work on adding PlayStation Suite SDK support and also Window8 Metro ( based on SharpDX I believe ). We already have a 3D branch, imaginatively named develop3d, which is where all of our ...


31

What is wrong with the Linux/*nix family for games? 'Wrong' is a strong word, but I'll list a few things that hold games developers back from working on Linux. Culture - Linux people tend more to believe software should be free - this isn't conducive to making a profit off selling your software. This may change in the future with online games being ...


29

No, it's not. Sleep only guarantees a minimum time to sleep for, but it may actually sleep for any arbitrary amount of time over that. Your timer resolution (set via timeBeginPeriod) is also important for it, and even if you're using something else (like QueryPerformanceCounter) for your timer, you still need timeBeginPeriod to control Sleep. So in ...


27

Console: static hardware that never varies across every single iteration. Home PC: hardware that changes from day to day, with a million different chip designs. Console: closed system that lives in its own, secure environment from birth to death. Home PC: wild west, barroom brawls and your OS is the sheriff keeping everyone from getting shot. Carmack: ...


23

In short, the most usable 3D game engines written in fully managed C# code (which allows you to develop for the Windows and Xbox 360) are: Ox Game Engine - a 3d version of the ButterMilk 2d engine - excellent features, Jiggle physics, reasonable scene editor, shadows. Free. SunBurn - AAA rendering with dynamic lighting & shadowing, occulusion, HDR ...


18

For game clients, it mostly has to do with culture, leading to difficult monetization strategies. Servers for multiplayer games, on the other hand, have gotten a lot of traction for linux/nix, it is a very attractive platform for developing server technology. There is hope that eventual release of Steam for Linux will help change that culture when it ...


16

In some situations ALT-TAB will cause the DirectX device to be lost. When the device is lost all GPU resources (vertices, textures, shaders and so on) must be considered invalid and cannot be used again. MSDN reference here. These lost resources must be released, and then recreated when the device is restored. In the case of most games restoring these ...


16

Blizzard is very custom-tech driven. I don't have links to the articles, but I remember seeing that they develop thousands of custom shaders per game for both multiplatform compatibility and backwards compatibility. Multiplatform support isn't something new. Plenty of software supports Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. As was mentioned above, the important part ...


16

From what I understand about the situation it can go either of two ways. The API is either being deprecated or they are ramping up to create a XNA version based off DirectX 11. Here is an article about each perspective: Deprecated standpoint DirectX11 standpoint


15

Yes, different platforms run different .net runtimes. The way this works in xna 3/3.1/4 is you create your game project for a single platform (say, create a new Windows Xna game project in visual studio). In visual studios 'solution explorer', right click the project and then chooses 'create copy of project for X', where x is the platform you want the new ...


15

Direct3D drivers on Windows are ridiculously optimized, sometimes for specific games, and developed by individual hardware vendors. Apple's OpenGL drivers are written and maintained (AFAIK) by Apple, and are intended for "general" OS use, compositing the UI and whatnot. There's no so much optimization for gaming and high-performance throughput. Basically, ...


15

Short answer: no, it is not. To have a fixed frame rate you have to call a certain callback function that forces a specific frame rate. Obviously, if you don't now how long a single iteration in a loop will take you cannot set a fix sleep time. GLUT provides glutTimerFunc(), which is, if you are programming in OpenGL, the right function you need. Take a ...


14

GLFW is modern and has a very well defined scope. It's also under very active development. SDL on the other side is rock solid and has a lot features in different scopes but is somewhat lacking in all of them (for example: SDL can do audio, but you might prefer using OpenAL because its far superior in that matter). It might be notable that SDL was ported to ...


14

but XNA was never a real success lolwut? XNA is an amazing success. If you just look at this site as a measuring ground, you will notice that: XNA is the top recent tag (it stays up there quite a lot) XNA questions get quickly answered, often with multiple answers Difficult XNA problems are addressed This shows that there are a lot of people ...


12

Turn to MSDN for all your Windows answers! "Games for Windows Technical Requirements: Best Practices for Games on Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7" has a section on Games Explorer Integration. Integration with Games Explorer requires that you author a game definition file (GDF), which is an XML text file that is embedded within a binary file (an ...


12

People mentioned that C# has a performance loss compared to C++. Is this true? I'll comment on this from a game developers perspective. The author of SharpDX ran a benchmark last year in which he compared the relative performance between using a native D3D11 application written in C++ and several managed alternatives written in C# such as SharpDX, ...


11

You can find the video memory of an Nvidia card using the NVX_gpu_memory_info extension, or an ATI card using ATI_meminfo. Here is a snippet of code I found which might get you started. However, Paul Nettle at flipcode wonders why one would want to find the available video memory, saying: The reason it's difficult (and sometimes impossible) to ...


11

While I won't discount the optimization that Microsoft may have put into Windows and/or DirectX, I strongly believe that most programs perform better on Windows simply because that's what the developers focus on (that's where the money is). They make design decisions with Windows in mind, and then later try to make it work in other OSs (Mac, Linux, etc.). ...


11

As others have mentioned, on OS X (and Linux), OpenGL is the only game in town for hardware-accelerated graphics. So the question really comes down to: why do developers use Direct3D instead of OpenGL on Windows? One possible reason, as suggested in the comments, is that they started out as a Windows-only project and later decided to add OS X / Linux ...


10

What John Carmack really wants is to write his own graphics drivers. He lived and worked in the pre-Direct3D/OpenGL days, when the game was responsible for talking to every little piece of hardware that existed. AMD actually made a similar statement, about how APIs are getting in the way of high-end graphics. I don't know if Carmack's numbers are right, ...


10

What is the future of XNA on Windows 8? XNA will only run on the Win8 desktop and there is almost no chance that Microsoft is working on a XNA compatible API running under Win8 Metro UI/DirectX11.1. If you really want to continue developing on a XNA like API on Windows 8 Metro, while still being able to use the content pipeline (one of the reasons ...


10

Yes, Windows 8 does support DirectX 9. For development, the old DirectX SDK is now deprecated, but you'll have all the libraries and headers you need within the new Windows 8 SDK, which comes included with Visual Studio 2012. You can go for the "old way" with no problem. If you need PIX for some debugging, or the high level D3DX library, you'll have to ...


9

There are graphic engines out there (take Ogre3D as an example) that provide an abstract layer on top of DirectX and OpenGL. So as a developer you just use the Framework and don't have to care much about the underlying GPU-API. Some special things like shaders may have to be written in HLSL and GLSL but there are also higher level shader languages that can ...


9

Couldn't find the right phrase for search but finally found it, "using corporation trademark". It seems you are allowed to freely use their logo's and trademarks as long as the product is really compatible with their software. For Apple Compatibility: If you are a developer, you may show an image of an Apple product in your promotional/advertising ...


8

There's nothing wrong with the Linux/*nix family of OSes for game development except for perceived audience. Most devs feel that the effort to create games for Linux won't translate into copies sold of their games, especially in the AAA communities. Even several companies that just ported even AAA games to linux (didn't even pay the upfront cost of ...


8

The best and simplest way to do it is to use your first idea and handle the WM_KEYUP/WM_KEYDOWN messages as well as the WM_SYSKEYUP/WM_SYSKEYDOWN messages. These can handle detecting the difference between left and right shift/control/alt keys, you just need the appropriate virtual key codes. They are VK_LSHIFT/VK_RSHIFT, VK_LCONTROL/VK_RCONTROL, and ...


8

First of all - let me say - I have done exactly this (developing on PC and then porting to Xbox 360 late in development) and had only minimal trouble. With XNA 4.0 and the introduction of the profiles (HiDef is what you want to target for the 360) it has become significantly easier to keep within the specifications of the Xbox. You basically need to ...


7

In Direct3D a device can become lost when you ALT-TAB out of the full screen window. If that happens you have to release and restore the resources and reset the device. This can be hard to do properly depending on the complexity of the game or the laziness of developers (hi Valve!). I don't think OpenGL suffers from the same problem because the driver is ...



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