Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

That depends: how do you want them to move? The unnatural option Define a preset path with a series of vertices and have the balloons follow the path strictly. A more natural option Make the balloons boids and implement crowd path following behaviour, which will have them follow the path (and not get too far from it) whilst avoiding collision with each ...


16

Can I discourage you from attempting to emulate a D-pad on a touchscreen device? The problems with emulating a D-pad on a touch screen are: the D-pad takes up screen space that you could be using for the game; unlike a real D-pad, an emulated D-pad offers almost no feedback: as a player, you can't tell which direction you're pressing in, neither by feel ...


13

We figured this out. The information is available online but it's really well hidden, so I'll post it here for good measure. Basically if the phone is tethered to a computer and the Zune software is running, it locks the media on the phone, which means that MediaPlayers in apps will never have permission to play a Song. In order to get it to work, the user ...


13

I would say try Windows Phone 7. Couple of reasons I say this, first and foremost, if you are already familiar with C# and XNA then you don't need to use your first couple of projects to simply learn the language even before you start learning the platform. This might only be because I personally am rather lazy, but either way I think it's worth ...


10

I know this isn't the most useful answer, but unless you are porting a project over from another platform, I'd suggest reconsidering on the virtual D-Pad. Most implementations of virtual D-Pads have been poor at best, the lack of tactile feedback make them a poor choice for the platform. You are far better off looking at building an interface to your game ...


8

I would say try Android. If you are already familiar with C# then it's easy to learn Java. There are some differences, but I think you can get comfortable with Java in a few days. On the other hand, XNA and OpenGL ES have different philosophies and you would need to spend time learning OpenGL (although you can get away with using the simpler Canvas class ...


8

Just multiply the vector by a rotation matrix: | fx | | cos a -sin a | | sx | | fy | = | sin a -cos a | | sy | where fx and fy are final coordinates of the object after the rotation and sx, sy are starting one. Obviously a is the angle involved.


8

Considering your background, this is a great choice as a way to get into game development. As far as advice and suggestions go, here are some ideas. What should I read? There are quite a few sites out there that post tutorials and news regarding Windows Phone / XNA development. Most important (in my opinion) to get you started is the official Education ...


8

Method 1 You don't have to create a solid white version of every sprite in your game manually - you could just as well automate the process at load time. In other words, you can use Texture2D.GetData() to access the pixels of your texture (and retrieve them as a simple Color[]), iterate over them replacing any non-transparent pixel with solid white , and ...


8

Draw a shadow sprite like you draw your character before the character (to make it appear behind him). Make sure its X position is updated according to the character, but the Y position stays on the tile. You have got a shadow.


7

Since you are using XNA, there is an easy way to do the above, which can be found in this following thread. In shows how to perform the transformation in 3D or 2D. For 2D, it is as simple as: point = Vector2.Transform(point, Matrix.CreateRotationZ(AngleToRotate); point += originPoint; Note that AngleToRotate is in radians. If you want to use Degrees you ...


7

Use Color.Lerp to interpolate between two colours. See the MSDN documentation. Pass this as the color to SpriteBatch.Draw. The arguments to Color.Lerp are the two colours you want to fade between, and a fade amount between 0 and 1.


7

There are two general approaches I would take. 1) The polygon-based approach. Each of your zones is defined as a series of points. You can then do point-in-polygon testing for whether or not your cursor position is inside a given area. You can also do things like tessellate it and draw an image on it. 2) The image-based approach. Author an image where ...


6

See this document: How to: Publish Events that Conform to .NET Framework Guidelines (C# Programming Guide). Ignore it. There is no compelling reason to follow those guidelines when you are making a game. Make your own delegate type that takes appropriate types (either existing object references or value types): public delegate void ...


6

Android The maximum size for the market is 50 MB, and can be downloaded over-the-air. Third party stores can have whatever size files they want. The 50 MB limit is only on the .apk file size, it is possible to load content or other data after the app loads, only limited by the storage on the users device. iOS The maximum size for distribution over cell ...


6

I recommend tIDE its open source written in XNA and comes with a rendering engine, and is an excellent starting point.


5

There is an XNA sample of touch thumbsticks here I would reiterate that a dpad is unlikely to be the right interface for a touch screen like device. Something like what epic has done with Infinity Blade for the iPhone may give you inspiration Movie Link


5

The nuclex library has more than one font renderer. Developer's blog, article discussing why XNA 4 fonts don't render as well as they could with spritebatch, with before and after comparisons of Nuclex font rendering vs Spritebatch in XNA4. Nuclex Fonts wiki. Nuclex Vector fonts (very useful for large fonts or fonts that need to be drawn well in 3D). XNA ...


5

You can use Farseer engine : http://farseerphysics.codeplex.com/


5

I have no first hand knowledge in this field, but here are the "Google answers" to your question. You could use GLEED2D if you want free form levels, or you could use Tiled Map Editor if you want tile maps. See also: Tools for creating 2d tile based maps Depending on your choice of map editor you might be able to find a suitable importer for XNA, ...


5

I'm going to look at how some pre-existing implementations work (that I have actually used) - and hopefully that will give you some ideas on how to integrate it with your game engine. Operation Flashpoint Operation Flashpoint (original release) has a command and control system for entities. This is essentially a list of commands that entities had to ...


5

In a multiplayer game, every gameplay-relevant decision should be made by only one system. When multiple systems make a decision, like in your case the trajectory of the ball, and they disagree due to timing issues, the game gets out of sync. When each client calculates the angle only after its own collisions and sends the new trajectory of the ball to the ...


4

Would they even have that info out yet? If its anything like indie games, they release it quarterly, and its only been a month or so.. (that quoted site is pretty old)


4

You could create a new sound that is a sort of "many marbles hitting at once" sound, then play it if there are more than 10 active collisions at once. Play any individual collision under 10, and then the "many marbles" sound if there are more than 10. Think of it like simulating a crowd applauding. At some point it just sounds like a crowd applauding, ...


4

It sounds like they are accidentally rounding their sprite positions to the nearest pixel. This can happen automatically if you use the SpriteBatch.Draw() call that takes a Rectangle as the position of the sprite, since XNA's Rectangle uses integers instead of floats to represent position. If sprites are drawn with integer coords, then sub-pixel rendering ...


4

You need a list of points and a list of balloons class Path { List<Vector2> Points; float[] Lengths; Vector2[] Directions; void Build() { Lengths = new float[Points.Count-1]; Directions = new float[Points.Count-1]; for (int i=0; i<Points.Count-1;i++) { Directions[i] = Points[i+1] - Points[i]; ...


4

The problem is that you're trying to build the XML file using the XNA's Content Pipeline. However, in the source code you posted, the XML file is being loaded at runtime using the LINQ to XML API (XDocument) so it doesn't need to go through the content pipeline. To solve the problem, go to the Solution Explorer, browse into your Content project to your XML ...


4

This is not a direct answer to your question, but some advice. You want to hit every market you can. Especially as s mall indie/hobbyist developer, every single potential customer matters. Developing for a single platform (even a popular one) is a very unwise decision in today's world of 6+ highly popular gaming platforms. At the very least, you want to ...


4

Your texture is a 32 bit texture. Somewhere between loading it and displaying it, it is getting downsampled to 16-bits (or some other low bit-depth). The loss of precision gets rid of the smooth gradients and gives you bands of colour like that. None of the things you have mentioned (loading it with LoadStream, drawing it with BasicEffect with that vertex ...


4

This note from MSDN seems relevant: On ARM systems, the value of the Epsilon constant is too small to be detected, so it equates to zero. You can define an alternative epsilon value that equals 1.175494351E-38 instead.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible