Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

You might think it's hard, but the way you came up with is the way to do it: send not the points, but e.g. all the moves of the game, and then the server recomputes the game and calculates the gained points (this is just one of a million reasons why developing multiplayer online games is harder than developing single-player games)


5

Emscripten can be used to port C++ applications to javascript. It was able to succesfully make the Unreal 3 engine run in a web browser. It works best in browsers which support asm.js, an optimization-friendly subset of the Javascript language which can reach performance comparable to native code.


4

You could ask them to record their play sessions with a video capture software like Fraps or GameCam. Additionally, you could also ask them to wear a headset with microphone and comment verbally on their game experience (the results would be similar to a "Let's play" video). The advantage of verbal commenting is that it is more spontaneous and honest than ...


4

It's simple arithmetic and requires no loops or periodic DB updates. The player has a rate of resource gain. This is fixed until some external stimulus happens like the player buying an item to change speed. You need only know the current speed and resource counts for this to work. Take the current time. Take the last time the resource counts were ...


4

pepper.js allows you to write C++ code and then deploy directly as: Machine code via PNaCl for higher performance, currently only supported by Chrome. Javascript via Emscripten for maximum reach. From the project page: pepper.js is a JavaScript library that enables the compilation of native Pepper applications into JavaScript using Emscripten. ...


3

No browser supports an unlimited amount of storage space (or anywhere close to your 800MB) for arbitrary web apps out of the box, and most are limited to 5MB to 10MB. The easiest way to explicitly cache data is to use the Application Cache (manifest). You can also use LocalStorage if you want to programmatically download levels in advance rather than ...


2

Emscripten is the best way to do this as of today. It can compile pure C++ code into a subset of JavaScript called asm.js which is very efficient and can be even further optimized. As of today only Firefox has explicit optimizations for asm.js, but the compiled code will run (quite well) on every major up-to-date browser (even IE!) and can be used in the ...


2

You really should tell us how this is being constructed as different technologies can have different advantages to your situation. Is it in Flash? PHP? HTML5? JavaSript? Java? The "web" tag doesn't give us much to go off. That being said: One of the most secure ways to transmit points score is to not let the client side decide what those points are. What ...


2

Use Application.absoluteURL. http://docs.unity3d.com/Documentation/ScriptReference/Application-absoluteURL.html If navigating to the game from another page, they can pass arguments via a ?query-string that the server can ignore, and that you can parse via string manipulation. If you need to transition to your game without navigating to a new page, you can ...


2

I've done things like this before using delta timing. Here is an example: int millisecondsThatPast = 0; int numberOfPowerUpsToGive = 0; int timeForEachPowerUp = 0; public void setTimeForEachPowerUp(int timeInMilliseconds) { timeforeachPowerUp = timeInMilliseconds; } public void onGameUpdate(int delta) { millisecondsThatPast += delta; int n = ...


1

Found a solution so to use the same code for both Windows and Web Player deployment (disclamer: I'm just reading these XML files): you can put the XMLs in the Resources located into the Project Assets folder. This basically tells to Unity to keep these files into the final build and you can load them at runtime using (in case of xmls for example): ...


1

You've confused the assets with client-side data storage. You can load assets using normal HTTP requests that the browser makes. These are subject to normal HTTP rules about caching, expiring and conditional requests. If you have 800M of asset data, you definitely need to do this. There is no limit to how many assets you can load in the "normal" way (these ...


1

Yes. There is always a large risk in what you can support and what you can't on the web. The best web developers will develop fallbacks for older web browsers that can't parse the new tags. However, if you're looking into just using things like canvas you'll probably be fine. Examining the list of browsers people are using indicates that this element is ...


1

What you need is a priority queue with the time of event as priority. If you create an event that will happen in 5 hours, you add it to the priority queue; it will probably be inserted somewhere in the back as in 5 hours has a low priority. Your main event-loop will constantly work on your priority queue and will check if the priority of first even is now. ...


1

Depending on what you have in your game you might end up using both, and connecting them through the models in your game. For example player could and should be in RDB (login info) but player inventory/variable storage could go to noSQL , so your player module could login() using RDB and fetchInventory() using noSQL by the primary key. Maps for example ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible