Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

Make your game framerate independent, so you can set it to play with a fixed timestep. Play your game, record the input. Replay with fixed timestep, recorded input and write every frame to a file - since you replay with fixed timestep it doesn't matter how long writing out a frame takes. That way your source footage is uncompressed and you can decide on ...


16

Blood, sweat and tears beers For the movie-quality cinematics you see from companies like Blizzard, they are often following a process similar (albeit on a smaller scale) to the processes of professional movie studios like Pixar. This involves professional 3D artists, modellers, animators, etc, as well as various high-end technologies like 3DS Max, Maya, ...


14

As Byte56 said, in libGDX you cannot play videos :( so i did this: I created a new activity "SplashScreen" public class SplashScreen extends Activity implements OnCompletionListener { @Override public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.splash); String ...


8

This article on Pixel Prospector may be what you need: How To Record And Edit Gameplay Videos The game used in the video is NeonPlat 2, which also uses vector graphics. The article covers everything, from capturing to editing.


8

Our basic rule is to never change an existing packet type. Everything is either added at the end of an existing one, or a new command. This also makes it far less likely for two people to stomp on each other's work.


8

Since you have the replay system in place, I'd suggest you only store the replay-data during gameplay and then render a video from that replay offline. Eg. after the game has finished and the user chooses to post the replay as video, then you would render the video from the replay-data (by playing the replay and using glReadPixels).


6

The XNA video player component is very much an opaque box that only plays loose WMV files. You can't really pack the file. All that the XNB file contains is a filename that points to that WMV file (plus some metadata for the Video object). The content processor (VideoProcessor) is responsible for copying the WMV file along side the XNB file at build time. ...


5

It depends on the use-case. For recording games, I've seen that a general 'game record' mode where the game records the user input on a timeline so as to be able to recreate the game at any point to be really useful, and you can generate the video afterwards, or pass around these recorded games and others can watch using the game engine rather than a video ...


5

The creation process is very similar to building geometry for games. Same tools for modeling & animation Max, Maya, zBrush. Most characters for current gen are built to extremely high detail for normal map generation anyway, so often those assets can translate easily to the pre-rendered realm. The main differences are in shader complexity, rendering, and ...


5

They use a product like 3DS Max or Maya.


5

Playing video with LibGDX has been defined as out of scope for the project. So no, you cannot play videos using LibGDX. This does not preclude the possibility of writing code specific to Android to play videos though. It just means your application won't maintain the portability of LibGDX.


5

FFmpeg lets you decode all kinds of audio and video data thanks to libavcodec. Most of it is licensed under the LGPL, which allows commercial use, but some parts are under GPL, and some parts might infringe patents. You might be able to avoid legal problems by using the free Ogg format (maintained by the Xiph.org foundation), probably with Vorbis+Theora for ...


4

For recording your game footage, you could try CamStudio, which is free. I find that it doesn't work with games in full screen mode though, so you'll want to run your game in a window. As for making the actual trailer, you'll want some video editing software. There are several expensive commercial options, but if you're looking for something free, your ...


4

Step 1: Create assets in 3d program (3DS Max, Maya or blender) Step 2: Rig assets Step 3: Animate the needed animations on the rigged assets Step 4: Create the scene, render and record.


4

Just a bit of a guess here (after answering this question): It's possible that the video renderer is clearing the graphics memory. Perhaps it has to emulate a quirk of the Xbox GPU hardware to remain consistent on Windows. I'm not entirely sure. But try using: GraphicsDeviceManager.PreparingDeviceSettings to modify: ...


4

Perhaps something like Droid@Screen would work? Here's a video of setting it up and capturing video using CamStudio. Droid@Screen is in alpha, so it might work. Good luck! I'll keep an eye out for those videos on your blog .) Hopefully your computer can handle that much :/ If your android device is rooted, there's an entirely on the phone option with ...


3

I'm not sure if the exact video you're looking for is included in this collection, but the link below includes 23 different lectures by EA employees on various aspects of game development: Electronic Arts: Game Development Lectures If nothing else, at least hopefully you can find something interesting and worthwhile in one of those videos. Good luck!


3

It's not inconceiveable, especially on a PC, that they just version the gameplay code and bump the version when they make a change that affects the replay system. If replay file is tagged with the version of the gameplay code it was created with and the client still has access to that version that it should work fine.


3

My best experience is with Fraps but I used the full version (it seemed like a small one-time prize to pay for a great utility) which has no limits or logo. You can set the framerate beforehand, as David Young suggested in his comment. Like many video capturing tools, Fraps uses a low-cost compression during while it's recording which then can be converted ...


3

I'm not familiar with Android development, but I've used this technique on other platforms. As you can take screen shots, could you simply lock your time step to say 1/30th sec (instead of using actual elapsed time) and save a screen shot every frame, which you can reassemble afterwards into a video on your PC. The main downside of that method is that ...


3

You can't. Only an OpenGL ES Extensions could allow it, but nothing is available. This item is on the Aras wishlist (Unity Engineer). Why can't you use IOS emulator to do videos ? The emulator is often faster than real devices.


3

There are a number of ways to accelerate glReadPixels. Firstly you can experiment with different values for the format and type parameters - getting these to match the layout of your framebuffer means that glReadPixels can do a direct transfer from the framebuffer; otherwise it will have to round-trip through software to convert from the framebuffer ...


3

RuneScape has put forth some effort into supporting the machinima community. They introduced an in-game item, the "Orb of Oculus". A player holding the Orb of Oculus is able to freely move and rotate the game camera (to an extent, of course); this essentially makes that player into a "cameraman", and they can record other players from interesting angles ...


3

(EDIT: The library in progress mentioned at the end of this post now has a project here - https://smallmedialibrary.codeplex.com/) I have spent a few days looking at this and so I will share what I know (and as usual leave the Q. open for future additions). As it turns out, doing video is really hard. It also turns out the only thing harder than doing ...


3

Yes, first you need to read the container (avi, mp4 etc) and then decodee it's contents that can be h264 for example) and then you'll get an rgb output that can be copied over into a texture like you normally would do, if the video is not HD you could do this every frame to play it back. You can use libffmpeg to read the video, but it's a little tricky i ...


3

The easy way: Use glReadPixels on the framebuffer every time you are about to swap, then feed these frames into libavcodec / libavformat (ffmpeg). If you would like a video larger than the screen, there is the hard way: Use an FBO to render your frames into a texture, then retrieve your data through glGetTexImage and feed it to your video encoder. (If ...


2

Devices like these are super cheap, and I bet you can get a hold of a second computer to run it on (it doesn't need anything special) so you can capture your game from your game running machine (be sure to have a computer with S-Video out for this cheap version). There is also something like this for higher quality capture - ...


2

One of our (ArenaNet's) developers wrote a blog entry about how cinematics for Guild Wars 2 are created. There's also an accompanying video by our cinematic art lead -- this may not be exactly what you're after, though, since it's not fully pre-rendered 3D. Back when I was a graphics programmer at Big Huge Games, we contracted with Blur for some of our ...


2

Most companies have a cinematic team that is separate from the game development team. The models and scenes used in cinematics are often of a level of detail that would be completely unplayable in a live game, so it's likely the only shared assets are concept art. Large studios like Blizzard (I believe at least one of Sony's various sub-corps has one too) ...


2

See this stackoverflow question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/200049/is-there-a-way-i-can-capture-my-iphone-screen-as-a-video



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible