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A skeletal animation consists of three things, really: the bones, the skin, and the animation itself. The bones form a "skeleton," a rig which is a crude representation of the overall thing being animated. A stick figure version, essentially. Every bone has a single parent except for the root bone, which is an orphan. The animation drives the skeleton. An ...


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It is actually easier than you think. The way this works is really simple, it is a lot like video. So, when you watch a video(I am sure you know this already but just as a reminder) you are not actually watching a moving image, instead you are watch a lot of images getting displayed one after the other REALLY fast, faster than your eye can see(There is a ...


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after setting glDepthRange(n, f); Full formula: finalDepth = (gl_Position.z/gl_Position.w)*(f-n)*0.5+(f+n)*0.5 Bonus: Every other answer out there about depth buffer always assumes the use of projection matrix, this matrix is a waste of space, time and precision, of the 16 floats that it has only 2 are really needed, the "field of view" and the "...


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After all of your transformations are applied (rotations, perspective transformations, etc.), all of the coordinates are divided by w (the fourth value in the gl_Position vector) to determine Normalized Device Coordinates, NDC. In other words NDC = (x/w, y/w, z/w) The x, y, and z coordinates in NDC space are in the range [-1..1] if they are in the clip ...


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If I remember correctly, z (as well as x and y) will be divided by w. Then, everything outside of -1..1 will be culled. And then, resulting value will be mapped to 0..1 (or to whatever range you selected with glDepthRange()). In case of default range, full formula would be depth = z / w / 2 + 0.5.



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