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16

I have not worked with Valve or released a game on Steam, but I attended a talk given by some guys that just released their first indie game on Steam. I doubt you'll hear much from them if you're in pre-alpha. He said that when they first contacted Valve, they were told not to send screenshots or demos or anything due to legal reasons. They didn't get much ...


12

It sounds like you know the pros and cons here. If it's between unity and source and it's just you, simplification is important for development time, and you want a large amount of support, Unity would be the choice I'de make. Unity does have an asset store to buy from by the way. Unity also lets you use c++ extensions so you can actually use c++ with your ...


6

I don't think it matters which engine you use; from what I've seen, steam accepts games that are of high enough quality (polish) and are relevant to the steam customer base. Winning IGF or some such also helps.


6

I've heard it's around 30%, but like all sites of this type, the actual pricing structures are under an NDA.


5

Generally speaking, it depends on how the game is programmed. In the case of Source-engine games, they used a multi-tier software architecture, and moved everything platform-specific into /tier0 in their code. When they need to port something, at least by the original engine design, they just swap out /tier0 files for platform-specific ones, and reimplement ...


5

In addition to Ben's answer, a bit of extra work is required to get it building in Visual Studio 2010. For the client project, you need to either change the name of the project from the default "Client (Swarm)" to just "client", or change the Target Name property to "client" from the default "$(ProjectName)". After this, it builds without a hitch.


5

The basic answer is that you first have to grab the Alien Swarm SDK. It should be a choice in the "tools" menu of your steam client. Download it, it's not very big. Then run it. One of the options is "Create a mod". This extracts the source code to a useful location for you and sets up some config options. The help guide from that menu has info on how to ...


4

Well, there's pretty much no other way to do it - you're going to have to loop through and call think() for every entity at least once every few frames. You could put entities on their own thread, but then you have the whole state-synchronization nightmare, which is definitely not worth it. On a first look, this idea is reasonable, but it can take too ...


4

You could always take a look at the Half-Life source code.


4

Understanding the Problem From what I can see the problem you are describing is the result of the camera's near plane intersecting the plane defined by the portal. While this intersection occurs you can see behind the wall the portal is on. This is similar to a problem experienced in other games when the player is just transitioning from above water to ...


4

After hours of research and programming I figured out how to properly get the visual effect for this. If you'd like to just buy a portal system that works for visuals and most everything else you need, check out the Portalizer Unity Package. I program in C# and that package is in JS, but the logic behind it is incredibly useful and well thought out. In ...


4

I'll share our experience of porting a certain game to Linux (and Mac). System-specific APIs - window creation, rendering, audio, networking, input, non-trivial filesystem access etc. The other answers go into details. I'll just say that portable libraries (SFML, SDL, but also things like boost) help a lot. Driver bugs - happen on Linux a bit more often ...


4

Yes, you can as long as you license the engine, with terms permitting it. The version of Source that comes with the games that you purchase is for modding those existing games, and you won't be able to produce executables with it (and if you do manage to, you're going to run into some other more costly problems). Interested in licensing Source, refer to ...


3

When you submit a game demo to valve, make sure it works and looks really nice. Don't send an alpha or anything. If you're not already known to them, they'll just look at it quickly, and if they don't like what they see, they'll shoot it down. Don't expect any feedback.. So make sure your in game/demo presentation is really good.


3

I downloaded Hammer to try this out. Looks like this is how you do it: With the Selection tool active, double click the object you want to make solid. Set its class to prop_static Select Collisions from the property list To the right of the property list, change the value in the drop down from Not Solid to either Use Bounding Box or Use VPhysics (The ...


3

Two types of plugins: Server Plugins: are C++ code libraries that modify the behaviour of dedicated servers. Client plugins: are server plugins running in a client (rather than a dedicated server). They have access to client interfaces that dedicated servers cannot provide. From the Source documentation: Client plugins must be signed by Valve before ...


3

http://source.valvesoftware.com/sourcesdk.php


2

I would take a look at Garage Games Torque-3D engine. They have a very good community, some great resources you can buy to use in your games as well, if aren't making your own content from scratch.


2

A lot of useful information regarding publishing games for Steam Unfortunately, pricing is one of the things they don't discuss publicly.


2

Neither of the engines you mention provide access to GPGPU (General Purpose GPU) support. UDK in its current architecture never will, because it allows no access to low-level languages (other than DLLBind, which has other limitations) There is talk that Source Engine will be upgraded with DirectCompute support (DirectX's GPGPU solution) some time in the ...


2

Unity is a tool I often recommend. You can code it in C#; that's a long way from C, but it's in the same family. It's cross-platform and easy for people with as much 3D experience as you have.


2

As far as I know, the AI is actually misleading. The AI in Half-Life is very scripted, even though it doesn't appear to be so, which is why they can appear to exhibit intelligent behaviours.


2

So, if everything that needs to be processed comes from a base class with the think function, the game engine could store everything on a list and, on every frame, loop through it and call that function. On a first look, this idea is reasonable, but it can take too much resources, if the game has a lot of entities.. Actually putting ...


2

The suggested answers were very good, but I ended up going for a different technique using a depth mask. What you do is take THIS script and shader, you put the script on every object with a renderer in your scene and set the render queue to 3020 (I'll post a script to make this easy later). Then, you create a box of planes (all facing inwards, in the ...


2

It's not just graphics (though that might be the hardest part). Consider also audio, input devices and other OS APIs (no Windows registry, etc.) Additionally, if you are using any third-party library, the library must also be available for Linux. Different Linux distributions may use different versions of the same library (or provide different libraries ...


1

These steps You mention are most likely done in separate engines. It is just that simple game engines usually have them in one pass. Your sequence for each object do physics do game logic draw becomes call physics subsystem call game logic subsystem call drawing subsystem Physics Engine takes care of positions and sizes. Game Logic Engine ...


1

To answer your 2nd sub-question: A great engine that not only builds on Linux, Windows, OS X and other platforms, but also abstracts away from all the OS-specific build tasks is Unity 3D. It gives you SDK which allows you to build your project for any of those platforms.


1

What you have to take into account and this following the train of thought of previous answers is that your performance will also be on when and how you call these think functions. Looking at the link you posted on the source engine you can also read that you can setup think times and different think contexts for each of your entities, besides the obvious ...



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