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One simple method is to use a force-directed graph approach. You model each vertex as a point mass in UV space. Each vertex receives a spring-like force that tries to keep it at the correct distance in UV space from each (post-seam-split) vertex with which it shares an edge, attractive when they're too far apart and repulsive when they're too close. That ...


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I'm fairly certain, though someone will no doubt prove me wrong, that you can not change individual elements in the mesh arrays of vertices, triangles, uvs etc. That is why when you work with procedural meshes you always update the entire array at once when you've finished modifying it. The reason for this is that mesh.uv gives you a copy of the mesh uvs ...


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Here's the approach I would use. No rotations at all, just projections: For the face you want to solve, take the cross product of two outer edge vectors. This is your normal vector. With your normal vector and the distance from the origin, you now have the face plane in Hessian normal form. ax + by + cz + d = 0 Calculate the barycentric coordinates of ...


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Conservative rasterization is a fix for this problem. Thanks to Nathan Reed's comments, in preparation for the generation of a lightmap, I dilate the uv coordinates and recalculate they're associated positions based on the dilation. For each triangle: Compose an array of edges in uv space. For each edge: a. Compute the cross product using the edge ...



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