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34

A quick and easy way - though not 100% precise one - is to consider just the five extreme points white, black, red, green and blue. First, let's transform RGB into linear space. Officially this is usually done by this formula (assuming the source data is in sRGB, which is the default for most graphic card operations on 8-bit data and nearly every image you ...


19

Most answers have addressed the feasibility of using heart container systems, I'd like to present a reason why you would want to use them over a health bar. Here's a word for you: Subitizing. People can make near-immediate judgments about the number of items in a group if you keep that number round about 4. Once you go above that point confidence and ...


17

If the health can grow significantly over the course of the game, I think that health bars are more appropriate. For example, in my current mmo game, the characters starts with 300 health, but that health can grow to over 3000 as the player levels. If this were implemented as hearts, it means you might start with one heart but have 10 or more hearts ...


15

If you stop calling it "pushing forward" on the joystick/mouse, and start calling it "pushing up" (which is the way that most players think of it -- particularly the ones who don't play flight simulators), then the "invert Y axis" name makes complete sense, since pushing up causes the player to look down. Edit: The fundamental issue here is people's mental ...


14

Why not do both? You can have a health bar divided on discrete intervals. That has a lot of the advantages of both systems: You can make health increases be always an extra block. After you get hit, you know how much of a block an attack takes and it's easier to measure how many hits you can take. You can choose whether to make the bar longer or the blocks ...


13

You seem to have conflicting styles. Have a look at these UI's from Peggle, Ultima Underworld, Diablo 3, Starcraft 2, and Gran Turismo 5. Notice how each UI is consistent within its theme. Peggle is pin-ball like in all its UI elements. Everything's a meter, a lever, a nozzle, a springboard. Ultima Underworld has UI elements are iron/steel, potions, ...


13

Conceptually, a streamlined UI is one where every UI element is exactly where the user wants it at the exact moment that the user needs it, and is not visible when the user doesn't need it. Obviously, what constitutes "streamlined" is semi-subjective. There are some objective measurements, and there are a lot of objectively wrong things you can do with UI ...


13

You could express it in terms of "attacks per second" or "attack rate". If the per-second numbers are too small to be convenient for the player to compare, you could just scale them by an arbitrary constant - e.g. 0.5 attacks per second (1 attack per 2 seconds) could be multiplied by 10 or 100 and displayed as "5" or "50". The way you'd code it would be ...


8

Unfortunately, there are no real interface design standards in the game industry, which makes it difficult to find accurate information this topic. If game interface design is something you're seriously interested in, I would take the following steps: Learn as much as you can about interaction design patterns - A lot of the research done on design patterns ...


8

I've never been quite sure why people are so obsessed with numbers and the very edges of the keyboard. Tell the players to put their left hand on ESDF. Now map commands to the rectangle bounded by 1, 5, Z, B. That's space for twenty commands, over half of which of which are very easily accessible, most of the remainder being only moderately more difficult. ...


8

Not having the source from which you read the terminology, I'm going to guess it was simply referring to the literal definition of the word "streamlined." stream·lined    [streem-lahynd] adjective having a contour designed to offer the least possible resistance to a current of air, water, etc.; optimally shaped for motion or conductivity. ...


8

One thing I'm starting to realize is very important: proper use of contrast. Look at that first picture. It's contrasty all over the place! The sky is bright, the horizon is dark, then the far grass is bright, then the bottom is dark. The tiled background wildly varies between extremely bright and extremely dark. All of this is non-information. Visual ...


8

The most contrasting color would be the color that is as far as possible from color X. It's easy to get it this way (assuming 0,0,0=black and 1,1,1=white -- floating point colors): y = rgb_color( x.r > 0.5 ? 0 : 1, x.g > 0.5 ? 0 : 1, x.b > 0.5 ? 0 : 1 ); The result is quite ugly though, so you might want to consider a few more ...


7

The iTunes App Store already has a process in place for adding custom terms and conditions to any app you upload. http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/LanguagesUtilities/Conceptual/iTunesConnect_Guide/8_AddingNewApps/AddingNewApps.html Scroll down to "Providing an End User License Agreement". Tell your lawyer about this if he doesn't ...


7

The first step is to have design goals. Figure out what kind of features your game will have, so you know where to focus your efforts and what designs to look out for. Will it be graph heavy? Will it be minimal and have panels upon panels hidden away? Will most of the action take place in the UI or in the game world? Will it be animated? Does it have a theme ...


7

The item you're talking about would be referred to as a progress bar: In this case, the progress bar is animated to fill up over a small amount of time. When completely full, the progress bar matches the highest score for that category. So, where 4975 is equal to 100% of the bar being full, 2000 is 2000/4975 = .40 or 40% full, as you can see in your ...


6

There are multiple options for where the art comes from. It's perfectly possible for the developers to create the art themselves, or have a separate team make the art. Probably the easiest way to get started on this is just finding free art assets and using those as place holders or even the final art if it's good enough. I suggest you check out these links ...


6

Just to distill Martin Sojka's excellent answer into something simple to apply, here's how to decide whether black or white text would have higher contrast on a given background color (R, G, B) in the sRGB color space: const float gamma = 2.2; float L = 0.2126 * pow( R, gamma ) + 0.7152 * pow( G, gamma ) + 0.0722 * pow( B, gamma ); boolean ...


6

(I'm gonna come at this from a color theory perspective) I think that your question isn't about how to make an attractive GUI, I think you're really pointing at is "How do I choose the experience I want to give my players?" And this is mostly a psychological answer. You mention choosing blue or green or red, and it's not really about the colors, it's about ...


5

Short answer: There is no short answer. Design is a huge field, with tons of books, articles, and as mentioned, libraries that cover this question. Colour-scheme, fonts, styles, layout, use of whitespace, negative spaces, textures, colours and their meanings in different cultures, why comic sans is evil and should never be used. There's courses, books, ...


5

I happen to have some of that code handy. I created this direct drawing code for some 2D HUD type stuff. However, you should be able to easily convert it to store vertices and/or extend it to 3D. It takes a center as the pointy end and a start degree and end degree for how wide to span. Additionally, there's a sides parameter that will set the number of ...


5

I'd go with calling it score, and awarding more than one point per kill. That way if your game design changes later to include say bonus points for killing more than one enemy simultaneously or other factors then it makes it less disruptive to add them in. I think big numbers also feel better to the user. For example play almost any arcade game and you ...


5

It seems intuitively obvious that the mouse (or, even more so, a thumbstick, which even looks kind of like a head sitting atop a neck) is modeling the perspective character's head. Maybe this seems intuitively obvious to you, but not to everyone. To some it would seem intuitively obvious that moving the mouse "up" should move your view "up." I'm ...


5

A simple piece to make your Tetris puzzle look better is to go with the original design scheme tetris used: Seperate the 7 colours that you will use (these don't need to stay close to the originals at all but may help with attracting those that recognize it's classic colour scheme.) Giving yourself a colour pallette before you have even made your set of ...


5

I don't see why you couldn't give some less subtle hints. Something like this: Seems like an obvious enough encoding. You could remove the keys from the levels that have already been completed. Of course you can tune the prominence of the keys into your desired solution. They could be the same scale as the locks behind the numbers as well. Just some food ...


4

You didn't say what kind of game. I'd say the easiest usability solution is, find a similar game that has similar mechanics, something your players might be familiar with, and use the same keys. So, if your game is an action-RPG like Diablo, making the default keybindings work an awful lot like Diablo is not a horrible way to start. See: ...


4

I believe the most likely explanation is that it's an artefact of the original Quake, which defaulted it's mouselooking to forward = up, and had a menu item explicitly called "invert mouse" for forward = down. See e.g. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_(computing)#section_11 Also interesting to note that for standard GUI usage moving the mouse forward ...


4

pauld's answer already points out that a simple heart container system may not scale if the maximum health in the end-game differs by orders of magnitude compared to what you originally start with. But there are two ways to fix this: Just like with money where you have e.g. gold, silver and bronze coins with a 1:10 or 1:100 scale, introduce a multi-digit ...


4

First of all: I'm no designer either, my games usually consist of "programmer art". ;) Probably the quickest escape, congusbongus already noted in the comments: Get a designer. However, this most likely will cost you some money unless you know someone or got someone really interested in the game, etc. But apart from that, there are some simple things ...


3

I've seen several usability guideline documents for mobile devices before, but unfortunately not for games specifically, which are a different beast entirely. For your example, I guess that would have to vary from game to game. If for instance your game used double tapping or sliding as part of the gameplay mechanics, then obviously you would no longer be ...



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