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54

In addition to the article linked in other answers, I can tell a bit about the experience of the Arianne Project. How to keep things synchronized? We have build framework „Marauroa“ around the concept of actions and perceptions: Actions are sent from the client to the server carrying user input like (walk left, attack monsters #47, say 'hello'). And ...


50

There are many things you could learn from. Here's my thinking on each, from the perspective of someone new to OpenGL. OpenGL Examples There is plenty of example code out there that you can read. G-truc's examples are pretty extensive and cover a lot of advanced features. However, if you are a beginner, learning from examples is a terrible way to learn. ...


49

Game development is like structural engineering There are minimum requirements for functionality. The minimum requirements are not exceptionally challenging and many people can learn how to fulfill them. That's the function part. It's the small part. This is where the decisions of what language to use, platform to develop on, or what libraries to utilize ...


33

Don't have umpteen walls of text of tutorial. If you need more than a single small arrow on screen, you should really consider why. "Why is the user clicking through dialog after dialog?" Wrong question. "Why are we showing multiple dialogs?" Right question. You say the dialogs inform the user how to perform the task. The task is too big. The task ...


31

Be careful when you look at OpenGL tutorials, because many of them (NeHe) included just teach you things that you shouldn't do anymore. Todays OpenGL is a different beast that it was 10 years ago. Some nice examples avoiding the deprecated stuff can be found here: http://www.g-truc.net/post-tech-content-sample.html The OpenGL Samples Pack 4.0.1.0 is an ...


28

First, you want to search for tutorials on the internet. Youtube is your friend. Seriously, it's probably the best way to learn drawing. It's easy to look at some really amazing drawing and say "oh, I could never do that, he's been doing that since he was a kid." But when someone slowly walks you through the steps and explains every part of the way, the ...


26

Yes, not having someone that have been there before to say to you what to do, how to fix, etc etc may be the worst thing you'll pass. But no fears! You still can read LOTS of blogs of people that have been there, they share their experiences in the industry, how they got into the success, how a previous game failed and why, etc etc. Good examples are: ...


25

If you're looking to research and learn about pathfinding in general, I'd definitely suggest learning more than just one algorithm. You'll want to understand the overall concepts but be able to apply them to whatever it is you are working on. Most game developers who need to do any serious pathfinding end up writing their own custom algorithms, although ...


25

Welcome to open source! As most developers will tell you: "What documentation?". Documenting code is probably the least fun developers have when creating a project. So what do you think is often severely lacking when the developer isn't even getting paid for their creation? Documentation of course! (Even fully paid programmers will often leave out the ...


22

Pathfinding algorithms are basically a graph search problem solving algorithms. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathfinding#Algorithms Most known being Djikstra's algorithm: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dijkstra's_algorithm and its variant A* search algorithm: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A*


22

http://gafferongames.com/networking-for-game-programmers/ Is a great set of articles on various problems and solutions dealing with game networking.


20

I would recomend starting with this tutorial series, they are good and use more modern features than the nehe ones http://duriansoftware.com/joe/An-intro-to-modern-OpenGL.-Table-of-Contents.html


20

If your testers are just skipping your text, you should do the same - take that as a clue to eliminate it. Instead, craft your game such that it gives users a progressive learning experience that teaches them what they need to know. On of my favorite games for this is the Half-Life series. You start out learning just how to walk. Then you need to learn ...


19

If the tutorial text is vital, why would you allow the player to dismiss them forever and get themselves lost? Here's a few ideas: A common approach I've seen is to dismiss the tutorial text only when the player has completed the required action. For example, if the current text is: Welcome to bobobobo's game! Press A to jump. Only dismiss that text ...


18

Right now, I can think of a few ways you can do a 2-D animation: Moving an object's x,y coordinates around (e.g. to slide a rectangular menu - you change the y-coordinates every few ms) Drawing every single frame out in an image editor and choosing the right frame to draw at the right moment (e.g. drawing a flame animation) combining the two above (e.g. ...


17

This guide didn't exist when the question was asked, but here's my guide to hex grid math: Hexagonal Grids


16

(Silly that I can only post one link as a "new user") If you haven't already looked through it, the XNA Creator's Club has quite a bit of resources: http://creators.xna.com/en-US/education/ Also, the first result when you search Google for "xna shader tutorials" has links to some great tutorials to learn Shader programming for XNA. First result when you ...


16

A traditional way to accomplish this goal in game development is to use a data-driven architecture for the game systems. In essence, this means that code does not implement a particular type of weapon (a gun) with explicitly defined values for its range/damage/penetration rather it populates the generic concepts of a ranged weapon ...


15

I pretty much have Theory of Fun by my side all the time.


15

I grew up with Riemers.net - very nice tutorial site covering everything form basics (drawing Your first triangle) to advanced techniques (HLSL). In every tutorial You create a cool application, like a flight simulator for example.


15

I have been working on a hex tile game and found these tutorials useful: Coordinates in Hexagon-Based Tile Maps Isometric 'n Hexogonal Maps Part I Isometric 'n Hexogonal Maps Part II Drawing a Hex Grid in Illustrator (for designing maps) Good luck with your project!


15

This attitude. This "don't touch it, until you know how to do it perfectly" attitude. That'll really hold you back. You see this attitude among beginning developers of all kinds though - not just games. Websites as well. Hey, a website is a database with an html front end with some javascript. You learn the technologies any way you can, you put your ...


15

Do it like Super Meat Boy. I assume your game has levels of some sort since its a puzzle plat-former, so as you mentioned Super Meat Boy I believed it's a great example for your question. In super meat boy, the way you control meat boy stays the same throughout the game, it's only the mechanics of the levels/environments that change. Therefore every ...


14

I recently did some experimentation with voxels for rendering terrain, with support for overhangs. I pretty much used these articles to build my prototype: This GPU gems 3 chapter on generating procedural terrain on the GPU. Even though my solution was CPU based (I work with shader model 3, so I couldn't reuse any of their shaders). There's a lot of good ...


13

This is a great beginning resource that takes a look at all aspects of path finding in a very easy to digest approach. Amit’s Notes about Path-Finding ... Pathfinding addresses the problem of finding a good path from the starting point to the goal―avoiding obstacles, avoiding enemies, and minimizing costs (fuel, time, distance, equipment, money, etc.). ...


13

Unity Documentation Learn Unity 3D Jason 3D Buzz unity videos Introduction to Game Development Using Unity 3D (Commercial video tutorial)


12

In addition to the documentation and the unity forums, I recommend the Unity question & answer site: http://answers.unity3d.com/


11

I agree with @Byte56 that you may be better off with something a bit simpler than Android game development, however for completeness (if other people would like to know where to look): http://steigert.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/1-libgdx-tutorial-introduction.html Steps through several different aspects of development with libgdx, from setting up your project, ...


10

With your .NET experience, I'd suggest getting read up on XNA. It's a .NET framework for creating games on Windows, Xbox 360, and Windows Phone 7. The "Hello World" of the games world is probably a very simple game like Pong or Breakout. There are plenty of tutorial on XNA: http://create.msdn.com/en-US/education/catalog/tutorial/2d_chapter_1 ...



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