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46

Game development is like structural engineering There are minimum requirements for functionality. The minimum requirements are not exceptionally challenging and many people can learn how to fulfill them. That's the function part. It's the small part. This is where the decisions of what language to use, platform to develop on, or what libraries to utilize ...


28

Don't have umpteen walls of text of tutorial. If you need more than a single small arrow on screen, you should really consider why. "Why is the user clicking through dialog after dialog?" Wrong question. "Why are we showing multiple dialogs?" Right question. You say the dialogs inform the user how to perform the task. The task is too big. The task ...


27

First, you want to search for tutorials on the internet. Youtube is your friend. Seriously, it's probably the best way to learn drawing. It's easy to look at some really amazing drawing and say "oh, I could never do that, he's been doing that since he was a kid." But when someone slowly walks you through the steps and explains every part of the way, the ...


26

Yes, not having someone that have been there before to say to you what to do, how to fix, etc etc may be the worst thing you'll pass. But no fears! You still can read LOTS of blogs of people that have been there, they share their experiences in the industry, how they got into the success, how a previous game failed and why, etc etc. Good examples are: ...


24

Welcome to open source! As most developers will tell you: "What documentation?". Documenting code is probably the least fun developers have when creating a project. So what do you think is often severely lacking when the developer isn't even getting paid for their creation? Documentation of course! (Even fully paid programmers will often leave out the ...


18

Right now, I can think of a few ways you can do a 2-D animation: Moving an object's x,y coordinates around (e.g. to slide a rectangular menu - you change the y-coordinates every few ms) Drawing every single frame out in an image editor and choosing the right frame to draw at the right moment (e.g. drawing a flame animation) combining the two above (e.g. ...


18

If your testers are just skipping your text, you should do the same - take that as a clue to eliminate it. Instead, craft your game such that it gives users a progressive learning experience that teaches them what they need to know. On of my favorite games for this is the Half-Life series. You start out learning just how to walk. Then you need to learn ...


16

A traditional way to accomplish this goal in game development is to use a data-driven architecture for the game systems. In essence, this means that code does not implement a particular type of weapon (a gun) with explicitly defined values for its range/damage/penetration rather it populates the generic concepts of a ranged weapon ...


15

Do it like Super Meat Boy. I assume your game has levels of some sort since its a puzzle plat-former, so as you mentioned Super Meat Boy I believed it's a great example for your question. In super meat boy, the way you control meat boy stays the same throughout the game, it's only the mechanics of the levels/environments that change. Therefore every ...


14

I recently did some experimentation with voxels for rendering terrain, with support for overhangs. I pretty much used these articles to build my prototype: This GPU gems 3 chapter on generating procedural terrain on the GPU. Even though my solution was CPU based (I work with shader model 3, so I couldn't reuse any of their shaders). There's a lot of good ...


14

This attitude. This "don't touch it, until you know how to do it perfectly" attitude. That'll really hold you back. You see this attitude among beginning developers of all kinds though - not just games. Websites as well. Hey, a website is a database with an html front end with some javascript. You learn the technologies any way you can, you put your ...


14

If the tutorial text is vital, why would you allow the player to dismiss them forever and get themselves lost? Here's a few ideas: A common approach I've seen is to dismiss the tutorial text only when the player has completed the required action. For example, if the current text is: Welcome to bobobobo's game! Press A to jump. Only dismiss that text ...


13

Unity Documentation Learn Unity 3D Jason 3D Buzz unity videos Introduction to Game Development Using Unity 3D (Commercial video tutorial)


10

With your .NET experience, I'd suggest getting read up on XNA. It's a .NET framework for creating games on Windows, Xbox 360, and Windows Phone 7. The "Hello World" of the games world is probably a very simple game like Pong or Breakout. There are plenty of tutorial on XNA: http://create.msdn.com/en-US/education/catalog/tutorial/2d_chapter_1 ...


10

Java is the default language to develop on Android, although you can use NDK (native C) for performance issues on specific parts. But basically, Java + OpenGL is fast enough for most 2D games. One of the best (in my opinion) development environments for Java/Android is Eclipse : you can download plugins for Android from the official website. You have ...


9

Classical 2D animations are created frame by frame. What you'll see often is that they use a reduced framerate (eg. every frame is displayed twice) to lower the amount of images that have to be drawn. Flash is a very good tool for 2D animation. It provides you with onion-skinning (previous frames shine through while you're drawing your new frame), tweening ...


9

The MSDN tutorial is pretty decent, actually. I assume you've got a decent understanding of gamedev in general (else you're kind of stuck). A book which I think is pretty good is Learning XNA 4.0. It starts off with 2D stuff for the first few chapters, but quickly progresses into 3D - cameras, models, shaders, et al. It's not much of a tutorial to making a ...


9

I agree with @Byte56 that you may be better off with something a bit simpler than Android game development, however for completeness (if other people would like to know where to look): http://steigert.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/1-libgdx-tutorial-introduction.html Steps through several different aspects of development with libgdx, from setting up your project, ...


8

The unmentioned assertion here is that tutorials are bad and not fun. Can we explain our game concepts to the player in a fun way? To give two competing examples, the Halo tutorial was excellent, and famously selected your axis inversion for you by just watching what you did when asked to "look up." Conversely, I've recently played a cricket game whose ...


8

Well, in my case, before I got accepted into Digital Media I had to present a folder of various 2D and 3D projects. Therefore, it's imperative that you try and get some of that formal training yourself, which isn't hard. It really depends what you're looking for. Vector and raster art are both big fields to work in, so I recommend programs like ...


8

Depending on the type of game you're writing, you may be able to avoid some of the low-level network programming. Some types of games do not require a lot of back-and-forth communication between the clients and the server. In such cases, one could opt to use a higher level framework. For example, I am developing a turn-based strategy game in C#/.NET. ...


7

There's a giant community wiki of tutorials and resources on Unity's answer's site: http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/12321/how-can-i-start-learning-unity-fast-list-of-tutori.html


7

The comments say it all, but ... no, there probably hasn't been much research on it. But, one thing is for sure: in-game, interactive tutorials work better than "read this" tutorials. This is easy to see in Flash games; you can see the evolution of static screenshots/images linked from the main menu ("Tutorial" button) into in-game tutorials (or ...


7

I think you should learn 3 things, to work with OpenGL: basic Linear Algebra and 3D geometry (vector spaces, linear transformations, normals ...) triangle meshes and how they work, how to store them into "buffers" general programming and general math skills to use in shader programming Try google for that. When you learn it, then you can start to use ...


6

By contrast, the game "Portal" is essentially a giant tutorial that teaches you how to beat it as you go. There is no "tutorial level"... rather, every level is at least part tutorial. Great game, very popular. So, to say "we need fewer tutorials" I think is an overgeneralization; there are many paths to making a good game here. If the question amounts to ...


6

The Android developer site doesn't make it clear anymore that the SDK uses the Java language, but that's the official language. Compiled languages can be used through the Native Development Kit, allowing for languages like C or C++ to be used; however, this is for augmenting Java code rather than replacing it. The supported IDE is Eclipse, and Google ...


6

Qt has no issue, unless you have trouble handling it properly. FreeGlut or most of the gui system uses call back functions(which is quite easy to understand), but in Qt it uses a single slot mechanism. OpenGL, Yes. In case of RPG I would like to suggest you to create the command line based rpg first, to get up and running the core logical part of the ...


6

I need a tutorial that does not skip to explain any lines of code. It should also include different independent objects moving/rotating (most tutorials use only one object), as well as imported 3d objects Arcysnthesis is the best modern OpenGL tutorial I know of, using imported objects doesn't add much to the use of the API, and it's usually API ...


5

This paper by Jon Olick is pretty interesting: http://s08.idav.ucdavis.edu/olick-current-and-next-generation-parallelism-in-games.pdf And those two forum threads about it: http://ompf.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=904 and: https://mollyrocket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=551 It gives you a nice overview about how things could be done in a modern voxel ...


5

SoulBeaver was correct to point out that you need to know art. A lot of the tutorials online will give you a mechanical guide on how to achieve a certain effect or how to draw with a tablet etc but if you don't know how to draw then you won't be able to produce much. By all means learn the software, if you want to do spriting then you need to know how to ...



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