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33

Don't have umpteen walls of text of tutorial. If you need more than a single small arrow on screen, you should really consider why. "Why is the user clicking through dialog after dialog?" Wrong question. "Why are we showing multiple dialogs?" Right question. You say the dialogs inform the user how to perform the task. The task is too big. The task ...


20

If your testers are just skipping your text, you should do the same - take that as a clue to eliminate it. Instead, craft your game such that it gives users a progressive learning experience that teaches them what they need to know. On of my favorite games for this is the Half-Life series. You start out learning just how to walk. Then you need to learn ...


19

If the tutorial text is vital, why would you allow the player to dismiss them forever and get themselves lost? Here's a few ideas: A common approach I've seen is to dismiss the tutorial text only when the player has completed the required action. For example, if the current text is: Welcome to bobobobo's game! Press A to jump. Only dismiss that text ...


15

Do it like Super Meat Boy. I assume your game has levels of some sort since its a puzzle plat-former, so as you mentioned Super Meat Boy I believed it's a great example for your question. In super meat boy, the way you control meat boy stays the same throughout the game, it's only the mechanics of the levels/environments that change. Therefore every ...


7

The comments say it all, but ... no, there probably hasn't been much research on it. But, one thing is for sure: in-game, interactive tutorials work better than "read this" tutorials. This is easy to see in Flash games; you can see the evolution of static screenshots/images linked from the main menu ("Tutorial" button) into in-game tutorials (or ...


5

It just occurred to me that type-out text is not just a gimmick used in Final Fantasy, Legend of Zelda, etc. If the text rolls on over a couple of seconds, THEN the user is given the option to press OK, user is more likely to read it!


4

This is a very good question for the UX (User Experience) StackExchange site, by the way! Provide a way for the user to hide the dialogs, but with a way to resurrect them when the user discovers he or she is stuck. Do not bother me with this stuff, I know what I'm doing [ ] <- checkbox (or whatever) When the user selects this checkbox and dismisses ...


3

I totally agree with BeanBag's answer. Some additional advice: Introduce at most one new mechanism / skill per level. Ideally spend a bit more time on each new skill, like exploring its complexity in several consecutive levels, before introducing a new one. It's also best to explore combinations of skills (e.g. double jump + shoot) before introducing new ...


3

The Indie game Thomas Was Alone presents the user with game rules and mechanics by means of dialogue, and narration from the main character's point of view. For example, the main character (red rectangle in image link below), Thomas, states that he doesn't like the look of the water below him, and that it gives him a strange feeling. If you fall into the ...


2

I would say, give the user an option to access a tutorials screen which contains the entries presented so far, or if the user is in the same area for long, display the tutorial again...


2

Assuming all the other answers don't apply, (and you really, REALY need to have text instruction) present that text at precisely the moment when the user needs it. That makes it relevant, whereas presenting it ahead of time makes it annoying. Wait for the player to be exactly in the right location; they are at the point where they need to take the action ...


2

As @davidvanbrink said in a comment, gating is a common way of doing this: either put the starting position in an large enclosed area that requires all the skills to escape and contains basic tutorials on each, or have certain portions of the game be blocked by barriers that require one of the skills and make sure that every critical path contains one of ...


1

Good tutorials are tricky. Cutscenes can be nice, but try to avoid too much infodumping. A long-standing rule of storytelling is "show, don't tell". It is usually better to tell the player almost nothing about the world beforehand and introduce the background as they play. Take, for example, the first hour of Half Life 2. There is a short intro cutscene, ...


1

You might be able to make it an optional thing that they can activate if they need it, or ignore if they don't. Perhaps better put would be, instead of a dialog with instructions, give an option to open up that dialog. I wouldn't suggest adding sound effects to it, those get annoying. And it might be a tricky thing to balance visually. But, personally, I ...


1

You need to more clearly separate how your individual modules work. Tutorial code should not need to reach into UI code, but the UI code interfaces should expose all the data necessary for an external source (like game logic or a tutorial) to drive it. For instance, every UI element might have a way to enable/disable it, hide/show it, or highlight it. The ...


1

For me the elegant way would be to have the option to skip the tutorial. -Explain the interface. A few slides will do. -Do not make the player feel that he is dumb, some people do not when they are "overtreated". Keep it short and quick and do not make anyone read a tome. I personally like to read, most simply skip and treat a tutorial like the EULA - you ...


1

Since we already have a question that discusses the issues of whether you should have an in-game tutorial at all, that only leaves the question of it being "forced". It depends: is it fun? If it's not fun, then it shouldn't be forced. Though I would also point out that if it's not fun, then fix that. There are plenty of games that have a "tutorial" without ...


1

As usual with these types of things it's completely up to you. You may need a tutorial, it depends on the complexity of the game. I suggest some play testing, to see how easy it is for people to figure out how to play. However, if you do make a tutorial, I would suggest making it optional. Simply give the user the choice to proceed through the tutorial, or ...


1

This might be really subjective, but could be used as a reference. From my personal experience, tutorials with lots of text immediately turn off some players (tldr) and then they get frustrated when they can't do something that was explained because they didnt read. Also do not give all the instructions at the start. Players will not see the relevance of ...



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