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37

This happens in almost every game -- as the artists become comfortable working with the tools, and as improved tools become available during production, the later levels to be constructed are almost always built to a higher level of quality in a shorter amount of time. To cope, you want to do all of the following three things: Assume that you'll have to ...


33

You need training. Consider entering a Game Jam. It's a friendly competition where you have to create a game in a very limited time frame, usually 48h. Quite often, a theme is given at the beginning of the jam. The prize is your own finished game. Such a tight deadline is an excellent exercise on "thinking small". You learn what are your strenghts and ...


21

The less experience you have, the more time you waste with up-front design. Making good designs is something that you will learn by doing it and then seeing/evaluating how it turns out. Some decisions have far reaching but obscure implications. After some games you will probably be able to make the initial design pretty solid and it will pay off to invest ...


14

I've been doing a lot of reading and listening to pod casts recently, and a lot of successful developers stress making a bunch of games as one of the best paths towards success as a game developer/designer. I've repeatedly heard comments along the lines of "Don't try to make your dream game initially, just make ANYTHING." I had recently been having some of ...


11

Even the biggest games are made up of a series of smaller systems. If you are really excited about a big concept, split your big game idea up into all its different component system. If you can't finish a system in a week, split it further. Then make small prototype games of each one of these components. Don't worry about hooking them in together, just ...


11

People are terrible at predicting the future. This is especially true for games, where requirements can change on a daily basis. There's a principle called YAGNI, aka "You Aren't Gonna Need It", which basically says that you shouldn't implement something until you know you're going to need it. I've seen so many systems get bogged down with architectural ...


8

It depends vastly on the kind of game and the tools you're working with. If you're making a first-person shooter in raw C++, you're going to spend a ton of time on programming. If you're making a 2d MMORPG in an existing game framework for 2d MMORPGs, it's going to be pretty much all asset creation of one kind or another. If you're making a puzzle game in an ...


8

This evaluates to true in my mindset today: Pragmatism over Ideology (1) Make it work (2) then make it right - game over if you forget step 2 Release it! Too much up-front design will be a waste of time TDD and Clean Code leads to more simple, more stable software designs


8

Even with a manual process of model generation, there are some tricks you can use to maximize your output. We can follow the same basic rules for real life conservation. The three R's: Reuse - Take the same model and apply a different texture to it. This can save you the time it takes to generate a model. And will give a convincing "that's a different ...


7

The answer is in the MSDN entry for GameTime http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.xna.framework.gametime.totalgametime.aspx Fixed-step clocks update by a fixed time span upon every clock step. This results in uniform clock steps that may not actually track the wall clock time. Fixed step clocks were popular on console systems where one ...


7

This is a very common problem, and there are a few exercises to get around it that I ask of my students. Try this thought exercise: take one of your designs that's too big, and ask what you would do if you had to cut 90% of the features. Here's another idea: change your design so that the game could be played to completion in 5 to 15 minutes. Can you use ...


5

I'm friend of software rapid prototyping. Especially during game development. It's good for quick learning , testing and useing things. For close to hardware programming or complicated algorithms is the best method for me. Theory(); RapidPrototype(); bool bOk = false; while(!bOk) { Testing(); LotOfFixing(); PlayingWith(); bOk= AnalysingResults(); } ...


4

This question really doesn't have an answer, but it's an interesting discussion anyway. Modeling and raw asset creation (textures, audio) this could take literally years, if you're a single person trying to make a make professional quality 3D models for a whole game. On the other hand, many indie games use retro pixel art, 3D primitives or hand drawn ...


4

If you have a brainstorm list of ideas you're part of the way there. Pick your favorite 2 or three and break down what you liked most about them. E.g. RTS: liked building the buildings -> make a game centered around only building buildings. dungeon-crawlingRPG: liked the combat with monsters. -> make only the combat part. no character choice, no stat or ...


2

Depends on development methodology the fast answer is "When you have enough information to begin writing code". My thinking on what "enough" should be is something like ... I wont be rewriting large portions later. What i'm writing is a small enough chunk that i can handle it as a "task". I see so many people taking on tasks like "build the terrain" ...


1

Try to keep your projects small, even if the result is "unintrestingly simple" games. The code from those projects can then be reused or extended, resulting in more interesting projects. If you are impatient to get something finished soon, work extra hard on getting the game idea simple and stripped of everything but the really bare essentials. I have been ...


1

Creating sprites or models is time consuming, adding animations just increases the time exponentially. Do what you can to create your game without any of the cool animations or fancy graphics. A cube or circle are awesome placeholders. Unity3d now has a store you can download lots of amazing free or cheap prototyping scripts/models/animations ($15 gets you ...


1

Firstly, I think you are being to hard on yourself. You need to start of with a project that certainly interests you but you should be keeping it small. The reason I think you should keep it small to begin with is so you do not become unmotivated. Games evolve as they are created, I think you should challenge yourself with a simplistic project and allow ...



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