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2

What you've described is the difference between Lanchester's linear and square laws. These are formulas estimating the rate of attrition between a battle between two military forces. The linear law says that the two forces suffer a constant rate of attrition, regardless of the size of the forces. This is used as an approximation of ancient combat, between ...


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Of course you expect the smaller army to lose most of the time, but they should still have a chance to do some damage. Which history shows is usually the case - quality matters more than quantity unless it's overwhelming. There's many ways you can accomplish this but here are a few ideas: Allow everyone in the small stack to attack, don't let the larger ...


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Hierarchies. Feudal structures. Allow weak new players to swear allegiance to powerful established players. The overlord taxes his vassals some minor amount set by the overlord with a maximum tax rate set by the game admins; this tax rate is published to all players so that it can affect their decisions on whom to claim as overlord. This tax obligates ...


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Risk has too many potential moves and too many potential outcomes per move to have a Chess-like AI be effective. You don't need to consider every possible move, and you don't need to do look-ahead. I would suggest you get some playtesters, or at least one or two smart gamers to help. If you're really just taking the Risk rules, or some sub-set of them, then ...



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