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24

This really all depends on what kind of game you're making. Not only the genre, but how you're presenting it: 2D top-down, 2D side-scroller, 2D isometric, 3D first-person, 3D third-person shoulder, 3D third-person isometric/freecam... Basically, from an artistic standpoint, rather than an actual game-mechanic standpoint, there are several things that you ...


23

I sometimes think the act of having to make a decision with a sense of "if I don't decide, things will not be as I wish" is good to create tension. It doesn't have to be that making the decision IS important, but that the player thinks they need to. For example, there's the idea of false danger. Crossing a rickety bridge (that really isn't going to ...


7

I think that tension comes from a change in your perception. When you feel secure and confident, you dont feel tension. Everything goes well.. or at leat, even if everthing is running with difficulties, at least are well knowed difficulties. When your perception of the world changes, you start to feel great incertitude. That is what generates a great ...


6

CmapTools was used to create this image, which is a visualization of a Choose Your Own Adventure book. This might fit your needs, even though it's not specialized for story-writing. The full size image is available here. The author of the image has some things to say about it and has some other recommendations: In addition to CMapTools, which has an ...


6

The industry doesn't have these terms nailed down well yet, but I'd say your concept is pretty far from colloquial use. "Game Engine" usually refers to a piece of software that is meant to be extended by a game developer with their own specific logic to make a unique game. The Game Engine would provide all or nearly all of the generic services a game might ...


6

Well the basic principles stay the same with story writing as novels. One of the things that are very important in writing a screenplay is, you should develop a broader imagination on how to build a character and to what extent you wish for the character to be the focus of your/your audiences attention. I'd also recommend analyzing characters from ...


4

I believe the correct answer to be 100% both. Based on how you've implemented it, you're going to want to do one or more of a few things: First, I think it's a big deal that you present your game artistically and in a meaningful way. I would never argue with that requirement. If the best way to do that, at various points of the story is through text, then ...


4

I have a few links here: Helpful tips for thinking about your story and the important points. The video is not neccessary, but you should read the text. Step by step to your story In short words: Grab your character. Grab your main key in your story (for example, in Super Mario, "save the princess"). Grab your checkpoints and/or enemies. Write your way ...


4

I googled 'directed graph software', but most of them seemed to work from C++ or Java, and not exactly what you wanted, which I'm taking is a script/storyboard tool for a non-programmer. Graphiz seems like it would work well with what you want: The Graphviz layout programs take descriptions of graphs in a simple text language, and make diagrams in ...


4

I would use the term "story engine" for what you're describing. It's a code module to handle the story, just like a physics engine is a code module to handle the physics. You'll also see terms like "tile engine" for a code module that handles graphics tiles; basically, a code module that handles a single aspect of a complete game will often be referred to as ...


3

Any kind of diagramming/graphing tool should be able to handle this. OmniGraffle on the Mac is an excellent choice -- options on Windows include Visio, Dia or the drawing program that comes with OpenOffice (maybe, not ever used it). As far as I know there are no real dedicated storyboarding software that supports egregious branching like that. There are ...


2

You could use StarUML, it's not strictly speaking for this kind of useage, but you could create quite easily any sort of diagram you want. Microsoft Visio is also a good piece of software, if you're a Student check with your campus you may be ably to get it free, otherwise you have to pay. I also found a forum thread (are we allowed to post to other ...


2

It can get very complicated. Have a read of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._P._Lovecraft#Copyright for example. You should seek specific legal advice from a professional on your situation.


2

It looks like Celtx might be lean more towards what you are looking for. Free media preproduction suite that focuses on script writing, storyboarding, etc... I used it for one of my game script writing classes a while back and was pretty happy with the workflow and results.


2

I've found one other online graph tool named grapholite. it's based on silverlight. It's easy to use and has a very easy to use sharing system (just like the one google docs provide). I think I'm going with this one.


2

I recommend you read the book "David Perry on Game Design". He brings up some important key points in compelling story telling, using the Hero's Journey as example.


2

I know that I personally always prefer to have complete control over the flow of dialogue, except in real-time situations. I get annoyed when a game prevents me from reading at my own pace. One major plus for me is when games have a setting that changes the default speed at which text is displayed on the screen. One possible approach to your specific ...


2

I just wanted to mention the game Amnesia: The Dark Descent. The game is basically scaring out the player and building tension. Not really creating stress, so these things might be not really what you are looking for. Of course music and sounds effects are important for the effect. But some things I noticed in the game are: Creating dark environments, with ...


1

The real physics don't get good animations like the ones needed for a interactive book for children. My advice, use a tool like Flash or similar to create the animations and then load the files from your Book program. A must see in animations is the 12 principles of animation


1

Not being able to substitute words like in English is not a real problem, because while in English you have this problem less often, it is still there: "There was a man named %name%. He liked kids..." - female names won't work here. Instead you could try to have fun with a more complex approach. "There was a %person1.sexAndAge%. %person1.personalPronoun% ...


1

Prototype Environment is probably a good phrase to use, not that it's standard or anything, but if your talking about a place to set up AI characters and play with the mechanics of the game, that's a layer above the game engine. game engine usually refers to things like the graphics renderer, which calculates lighting, etc. and some basic components ...


1

Along the same lines of what Adam said, you will want to get very specific with this. Pick a specific story and then see if it is available in the public domain. Otherwise this is too broad of a question to answer and it can get tricky with authors assigning their books over to estates to get extended renewal rights and such.



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