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0

TCP guarantees delivery, and when there are problems that aspect will cause hangups as the whole thing stops to make sure everything got through. If it's going to be just a few dropped packets here and there, UDP will keep your speed up.


0

Case 1: unity has built in networking code to handle this in full 3d if need be. Case 2: there are likely a ton of solutions to this already on the unity store for cheap or free. Personally if i was building diablo I would do something like this: When kicking off a new game my custom server would pick a random "seed" value. Any clients that join the game ...


1

It depends a lot on what minimum requirements you want to have for your game, the worst case scenario would be dial-up modems, unfortunately they can only handle 33.6 kbit/s or 4.2kB/s in upload speed (they could still probably play the game as a non-host however). Looking at the state of internet report from Akami Technologies you can see that the average ...


1

50'000 bytes per second is absolutely reasonable for PC game. You might have issues with number of packets though, knowing RTS games design, you should wrap packets in bundles (as discussed in your previous questions).


1

After searching around, it seems that synchronizing the clocks of 2 or more computers is not a trivial task. A protocol like NTP does a good job but is supposedly slow and too complex to be practical in games. Also, it uses UDP which won't work for me because I'm working with web-sockets, which don't support UDP. I found a method here however, which seems ...


0

Basically, you cannot fix the [entire] world and, eventually, you will have to draw the line. If the server and all clients share the same frame-rate, they just need to synchronize upon connecting, and occasionally, thereafter, especially after a latency event. Latency does not affect the flow of time or the PC's ability to measure it so, in many cases, ...


1

Their service would call your server executable (if it was called server.exe) like below server.exe -game_id= -game_build_version= -game_mode= -server_host_domain= -server_host_port= -server_host_region= -playfab_api_endpoint= -title_secret_key= -custom_data= -log_file_path= -output_files_directory_path= -batchmode When they say, In designing your ...


-1

To make this happen you must ensure that the game is always online. it has pros and cons also. This is only method by which you can ensure validity of score. at login time validate the score from server and when connection breaks store the last score made by user and next time he logins to the server update and match the score from server.


7

Scrambling the transmitted score is probably worthwhile. To avoid cheat-engine type stuff, you can always scramble it in memory too. If you're storing seven variables, each of which, %10, is a digit, and you add a random number of 10s to each variable whenever a score changes, then it will be tricky to find a variable that matters. You could also get quite ...


3

You are right that there is risk in just letting a player post any score they want. That said, it will be very hard for you prevent cheating, as long as the player is playing offline and on their own machine. If the game is online, and your server is calculating all scores, then you can safely store the score, since you trust how it was calculated. There ...


5

If what you get is just a score number, you can not verify how it was achieved. To make it more secure you need to obtain a full replay and verify that the game was fair (no cheats used, no score hacking). One of possible implementations of this idea is keeping the game on the server. If all logic is on the server and player can only send his actions, then ...



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