Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

Make your game framerate independent, so you can set it to play with a fixed timestep. Play your game, record the input. Replay with fixed timestep, recorded input and write every frame to a file - since you replay with fixed timestep it doesn't matter how long writing out a frame takes. That way your source footage is uncompressed and you can decide on ...


8

This article on Pixel Prospector may be what you need: How To Record And Edit Gameplay Videos The game used in the video is NeonPlat 2, which also uses vector graphics. The article covers everything, from capturing to editing.


5

The way I do this is as follows. IDirect3DDevice9::GetBackBuffer: Get access to the IDirect3DSurface9 representing the back buffer, same as you've currently got. Don't forget to Release this surface when done as this call will increment the reference count! IDirect3DSurface::GetDesc: Get the description of the back buffer surface, which will give you it's ...


4

For recording your game footage, you could try CamStudio, which is free. I find that it doesn't work with games in full screen mode though, so you'll want to run your game in a window. As for making the actual trailer, you'll want some video editing software. There are several expensive commercial options, but if you're looking for something free, your ...


3

My best experience is with Fraps but I used the full version (it seemed like a small one-time prize to pay for a great utility) which has no limits or logo. You can set the framerate beforehand, as David Young suggested in his comment. Like many video capturing tools, Fraps uses a low-cost compression during while it's recording which then can be converted ...


2

Devices like these are super cheap, and I bet you can get a hold of a second computer to run it on (it doesn't need anything special) so you can capture your game from your game running machine (be sure to have a computer with S-Video out for this cheap version). There is also something like this for higher quality capture - ...


2

See this stackoverflow question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/200049/is-there-a-way-i-can-capture-my-iphone-screen-as-a-video


2

You need to render your scene twice. First, you render the scene from the view of the camera to texture. Then you render the scene from the players point of view, but with the texture applied to the cameras screen. What changes between the two render passes is the camera transform used, while the camcorder uses the orientation & location of the ...


2

Pretty much exactly the same as networking works, except they store the gamestate in a buffer rather than send it to a remote client. The replay is just the playback of that buffer. The buffer, and your Networking, will track (at least) the location, orientation, and some sort of state information about every object which can effect the game state ...


2

Shaders don't capture the screen in and of themselves. What's being suggested in the "shader based approach" is to: 1) Use render-to-texture or the like to render your entire scene to a single texture 2) Render that texture (with, say, a fullscreen quad) to your final output (or another texture if you want to chain effects or do multi-pass effects) using ...


1

You cannot capture screen with GetBackbuffer, this function only get a pointer of the back buffer, not the data. The correct way I can think is as below Create an off-screen surface by calling CreateOffscreenPlainSurface. Call GetFrontBufferData to get the screen image to the off-screen surface Call LockRect of the surface to retrieve the data in the ...


1

I believe you need to LockRectangle on the pBackBuffer and then read the pixels from D3DLOCKED_RECT.pBits . This should be pretty fast. If you need to read only a few pixels, consider copying whole backbuffer to smaller buffer via something like DX11 CopySubresourceRegion (I'm sure there is alternative in DX9 as well), which is done on GPU and then stream ...


1

Basically, the issues were: Quality on a vector-based game. CPU amount taken. I/O bottleneck. What software to use for editing. To solve quality, I needed a lossless codec, or no compression. The lesser the compression, the more I would have I/O problems, but the more CPU I took, the more I would have CPU problems (doh). The solution, was use a RamDrive ...


1

I haven't used it, but you might want to try Taksi.


1

I've used Windows Media Encoder a couple of times to record videos of my games and tools - it's free and produdes good quality videos. Although, I've wondered the same question too, because recording a video is only half the process (if that). The other half is editing it, adding effects, etc. Windows Movie Maker kinda works but it's fairly simplistic... ...


1

If on Windows, record using PlayClaw if you want a game video without barely slowing down your computer. On Linux you have glc.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible