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13

"Cracks" in the geometry mostly. These games have a few things in common, they have gravity and they have collision detection. These anomalies are locations where the collision detection failed in some way. It could have been sharp edges, gaps or a number of other geometry anomalies. Could even been issues with time steps in the physics engine, where the ...


6

In general, it's not a bad idea to separate the game mechanics from their visual representation. When you have a game logic which is completely oblivious to how it is displayed on the one hand, and a graphic engine which creates a visual presentation of the current game state but doesn't care about how this state is created on the other, your code will be ...


5

I think it's not possible to say that there is one particular reason why clipping through the world happens. Due to the differences in game engines/ physics procedures between games, any number of reasons can lead to this. Stemming off this, I'm quite sure that falling out of the world has not been eliminated, necessarily. Having a few large-scale game ...


4

The Game State Management sample that deals with screen transitions can be found here. (The MSDN site recently updated their App Hub url's so I'm guessing a lot of links will be broken for a while) Personally I find some of the code to be too complex for beginners, with the constant use of events to be fired when menu items are clicked, and layering of ...


4

I'd go for option B, and yes this will require that you slighly modify the base classe(s) of you renderable objects so it contains at least the following: A 2D vector for the position; A Z-coordinate for depth sorting. Using layers (option A) might seem to be a good idea when you start, but it's not necessarily the best option. This way your objects ...


4

Option A seems best to me. I don't do much in 2D, but isn't the draw order what's really important? Each item has an index, things added last get drawn last therefore being on top. You can give the user the option to change the order ("send to back", "bring to front" type things). I don't know how you're using lights, but it seems like those could be at ...


4

I won't say it is impossible, I will say it seems impossible but I love the idea and you should definitely try it. I would start with duplicating the question on http://photo.stackexchange.com/ As for what techniques I would try: make a photo with a high contrast lightning, probably achieved by some back-light, e.g. a lamp hidden behind one of trees (or ...


4

My guess would be that older engines probably used a quick and simple ray vs triangle test to detect collision with the geometry. That means even the tiniest gap (or a precision error in the calculations) could let the player through occasionally. More modern games will probably use a more expensive test with a sphere or capsule representing the player, and ...


3

Most levels in 3D platformer games are built on a 3D grid. The old Tomb Raider games are very obvious about this. (Press forward and the character moves one square every time, you know you can jump 3 squares if you are running but only 2 if you are standing, etc.) Even more recent examples, such as Darksiders 2 follow the same idea. The character has a ...


3

Your idea is correct. The scene can be as big as you want. In fact, you don't need to bound it. You just create the correct camera and then set camera.setChaseEntity(mainEntity); But you are not creating the camera correctly. Look at the constructor: public BoundCamera(final float pX, final float pY, final float pWidth, final float pHeight, final float ...


3

Generally you should prefer composition over inheritance where possible. In this example I would not have Sprite as a base class that game objects derive from. Whether to draw a sprite or not would just be a property of the Entity object. I might have Sprite and Text following a Drawable interface, and just associate them with Entities as appropriate.


3

Perhaps I´m over thinking it. Yes, you are. Transformation being done in shaders is meant to be literal. "Transformation" in this case being the application of some transform to the various per-vertex attributes. Where that particular transformation comes from is generally irrelevant to the shader. It is given a transformation, and it applies it to the ...


3

The AndEngine documentation states that a Scene is nothing more than a mere container for a specific game state. Logically, if it makes sense for each "level" to be a state - (they are distinicntly different and require some complicated setup or it's just easier), just drop the scene. A scene is a self-contained state - just make sure to be careful that ...


3

Generally speaking, most people plug in a 45 degree angle in for the FOV. If you do this, a camera is then usually positioned just far enough away to include everything in the scene. No default on this distance because scale is so arbitrary in a 3d virtual world. There is a concept of a default lighting rig where you have 3 directional lights. One lighting ...


3

I think following link become useful to you in managing multiple scene in single game. https://sites.google.com/site/matimdevelopment/creating-and-managing-scenes Also in AndEngine forum, we discussed about this topic that link I provide to help other guys. http://www.andengine.org/forums/gles1/how-to-manage-multiple-scene-t10350.html


2

Try opengameart.org. There are some great models there. Mind the licenses though. :)


2

What you are probably reading is that it's seen as a mistake to reuse a graphics scene graph as the managed scene data structure for the rest of the program to work with. For a long while, back in the stone age, memory was tight and there was only one data structure holding a level together and it served rendering and game logic. Now we have a little room ...


2

Model, View and Projection matrices are passed as uniforms to the vertex shader, which uses them to transform vertex coordinates and normals. Typically projection matrix is constant between frames, view matrix is calculated once per frame and model matrix is unique for each object. Model matrix is in world space. This is of course not the only way to do ...


1

This is a simple math. First you find the vector between those two points. Then create a vector (use vector pool) from it. Let's say your touch coordinates are [p1x, p1y] and the up coordinates are [p2x, p2y]: dx = p2x - p1x; dy = p2y - p1y; Vector2 v = Vector2Pool.obtain(dx, dy); You can normalize it to get the same speed everytime. Simply call: ...


1

Typically, your scene graph in an ECS (there's a lot of variations, but this is my take on it.) can be represented in a couple ways. The most popular way of doing this sort of thing and easiest is simply a list of 'Entities' that are attached. These Entities might have children/parents, they might not. It depends how you choose to model things. In the most ...


1

Set the script to an object and set this in the script: void Awake () { DontDestroyOnLoad (transform.gameObject); } Your object pass all scenes and you can give their variables these values you need in the other scenes.


1

Take a look at this tutorial. It's one for AndEngine but I'd recommend it as I think it's design is pretty good. I've been using this design and in my game you can also touch the screen to go to the menu quicker and it has never crashed before. The technique is actually, like you might've tried, to switch scenes and then unload everything from the previous ...


1

Instead of using mScene.setBackground(background) take a look at background.attachParallaxEntity(). The AndEngine example for autoparallax is a good example on how to do this. Here's the critical part: final AutoParallaxBackground autoParallaxBackground = new AutoParallaxBackground(0, 0, 0, 5); final VertexBufferObjectManager vertexBufferObjectManager = ...


1

i think there is no way to make spriteparticle clickable as i am facing the same problem have you got the answer


1

I have been in the same situation as you and this is how I solved it. Before that, some clarification: In my SceneGraph each SceneNode keeps track of its own local transform (scale, rotation, translation) and a concatenated transform (world). SceneNodes can have multiple components. BEPUPhysics is the physics library being used, its entity transforms are ...


1

You are approaching the problem from the wrong side. You don't have a scene graph and need to integrate physic engine. You are using a rendering library that uses a scene graph and want to also use a physics library that does not use a scene graph. How about you step one step back and stop thinking about the solution domain (scene graph) and start thinking ...


1

Consider to use component-based game object system: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1901251/component-based-game-engine-design It is very flexible and modern approach which is good for middle- and big-sized games.


1

It is possible to create an adventure based on real photos. The question which is better, comic/hand-drawn style or realistic, depends on the style and content of your game. Myst is a fairly old but also popular example of realistic adventure games. There are plenties of free solutions which helps you to create such a game. If you are interested in the ...


1

It is entirely dependent how you implement and construct your portals in your code, it sounds like you currently rely on the user to physically create a portal from a rectangular shape or poly and transform this into the correct position, which is an editor design consideration. You can however modify how you verify the placement and use of portals in your ...


1

I think the whole point of Static is that it only applies to objects that are placed in the scene and stay there throughout - not ones you load via Resources.Load(), for example.



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