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Having a huge image for your map will take more texture memory than a tileset would. Assuming a 32bit color depth, a 6400 x 6400 px map will take 156 MB of texture memory. Not much for PCs and consoles but might be too much for some low-end mobile devices. But drawing it will be slightly faster because you don't need to iterate tiles but can just blit from ...


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I would do this rather than have a dozen classes and races; public class GameCharacter { public enum CharacterClass { WARRIOR { @Override public void attack(GameCharacter from, GameCharacter target) { //Do something here } }, MAGE { ...


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As hinted at in the comments, you'll want to use a combination of Inheritance and Composition. (Inheritance being is a and Composition being has a). In your case, each Character isn't a race or a class, but instead has a race and has a class. Each race would then inherit from a base Race class, and each Class would inherit from a base Class class. An ...


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Good tutorials are tricky. Cutscenes can be nice, but try to avoid too much infodumping. A long-standing rule of storytelling is "show, don't tell". It is usually better to tell the player almost nothing about the world beforehand and introduce the background as they play. Take, for example, the first hour of Half Life 2. There is a short intro cutscene, ...


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As Alexandre commented, the best way to go about this is lots of work and testing. There is no simple solution or algorithm that can give you this answer. The tiniest change to any skill, stat, or other variable will directly affect the gameplay. Your best bet is to just give it whatever values you think will lead to the gameplay you want and tweak them as ...


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As the two current other answers suggest, limiting visibility is a good way of doing this. There are other games which did this. One I can think of is Breath of Fire II, where early on in the game you are navigating a cave with only a candle for lighting. This restricts the visibility and creates tension (which mounts to a nice payoff in that game). But I ...


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Use per-tile lighting to do sight-range reduction. Shadowlands (1992) - 3 light levels: Diablo (1997) - 8 light levels: You can do much more with this dynamic, such as easily having monsters only spawn on dark tiles, have light streaming out of doorways and windows, etc. To induce claustrophobia beyond just lighting, have a look at the way the Maggot ...


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Reduce the players sight-range. You can do that by adding an overlay mask on top of the rendered scene. This simulates the reduced sight-radius of the player-characters due to darkness. It forces the player to concentrate on a very small section of the screen giving a feeling of claustrophobia. But keep in mind that it disorients the player, so cut the ...



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