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I dug into this some more and have come to the following understanding. I'm open to be corrected though, so if anyone knows more, please chime in. For now though, this is what I think is going on. rigidbody.inertiaTensor contains the diagonalized elements of the inertia tensor or the principle moments of inertia. These correspond to some internal symmetry ...


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Fixed by setting Linear Drag in RigidBody 2D at 1.1 (value depends on gravity, etc), which damped the fall speed and now the objects don't accelerate with time when falling. Rotation can also be damped by setting Angular Drag to the appropriate value.


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It seems to me that what you're doing has the correct basic form. But I think rigidbody.inertiaTensorRotation needs to be taken into account, though I'm not 100% positive on this either. I would argue though, that it must be that rigidbody.inertiaTensor is diagonal with respect to some arbitrary coordinate frame, while rigidbody.angularVelocity is most ...


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In general rigidbody physics is appropriate to model non-living things, while a completely different system of bone and animation based physics is usually used on living things and things which behave like living things (like robots or zombies). For example, if you drop a stone on the side of a hill you can model what will happen using a very simple system, ...


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Get the Rigidbody component. Then change the velocity value. Rigidbody rb; void Start() { rb = GetComponent<Rigidbody>(); } void ChangeSpeed() { rb.velocity = new vector3(x,y,z); //place your value in xyz } For further reference: Unity Physics Rigidbody Velocity



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