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1

There's quite a selection of display methods for voxel data. The most easy to grasp is certainly, one voxel=1 box, but it will leave you with a very cubic looking world. You can also look into marching cubes (going through your grid and testing how full each set of 8 voxels is, and filling with a selection of pre-generated meshes). There are a number of ...


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Your interviewer was talking, with his own words, about bindless API. nVidia made nice presentations recently about all that, which they call direct state access (1, 2). This does not replace VBOs. EDIT: Actually, let's consider Trevor Powell's suggestion: This seems like some people could definitely decide to drop VBOs, in favor of attribute-less ...


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There is no absolute answer. Generally a "model" is some representation of something interesting in your computer program. In CG it often means the geometry, and a typical model format might be something like: List of vertices (maybe with graphical attributes like color) List of polygons which reference vertex list with attributes like Material ref or ...


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A model often refers to it's geometric data such as vertices (aka mesh data) and it's rendering properties commonly refered to as materials to give you the actual rendered object. A single model can reference multiple materials where a material describes the blending algorithm, texture data, and shader references that combined together yield what finally ...


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A model is a logical container that contains - among other things - mesh data. Depending on the format it can also reference external assets such textures and shaders. With FBX, for instance, you can even export cameras and lights from whatever DCC was used to create it, so your model can contain that data. At that point, you can even think of the model as a ...


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Run the game like any other, calculate data on the client side as needed and simply overwrite when you receive packets from the server.


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tl;dr You control how much data you are willing to process each frame. If a packet is too big, break it into smaller cells and process them one at a time (i.e one each frame). If you get a lot of small packets than split the group into chunks and limit the amount of information processing that is done each frame. The client does not need all the information; ...


1

I assume that when your network data arrives, its processing diverts enough CPU power to slow down your rendering process. Are you enforcing a constant framerate or are you just rendering frames as fast as you can? Assuming you have a constant framerate, you may chose when your network packets are processed. I mean by that that your websocket event should ...


0

The client is written with JS? If so, than you need to use some kind of async library to make network IO in backgraound. There is RxJS and many other (try google: reactive, async etc.). Also consider switch from JS to CloujeScript: some local guys are using it for kind of tasks you've described.


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Here's how most people start out in it for "basic" terrain height maps ... Create my volume (voxel array). Generate a Y value for each x,z im interesting (terrain heightmap generation). Loop through a column of voxels from 0 to terrain height and set their values as "inside the volume" (on). Generate a mesh based on examination of the volume by looping ...


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I found the answer to my question by experiencing. Take a look here to learn how to reconstruct position from depth buffer. As you can see, converting do view-space is a little cheaper. So that's what I chose. Position and Normals on view space. The only drawback is having to project your lights position from world to view space, but that's done only once ...



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