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1

The normals would be generated based on the gradient of the density function at the same time that you get the intersection points between the edges and the surface. If it's something simple and closed-form like a sphere then you can calculate the normals analytically, but with noise you'll need to take samples. You have the next steps in the wrong order. ...


0

Have a look at these tutorials, Cocos2d 2.0: http://www.raywenderlich.com/4428/how-to-mask-a-sprite-with-cocos2d-2-0 Cocos2d 1.0: http://www.raywenderlich.com/4421/how-to-mask-a-sprite-with-cocos2d-1-0


0

From reading the paper up to page 2, it appears the weights of volume are stored at the corners of the grid instead of being the weight of the cube itself as normal Marching Cubes style algorithms prefer. These corner weights define a point between along the edge between 2 corners where there is a sign change from corner to corner.. Edges with sign changes ...


0

What is the correct multiplication order for the entity/model matrix? Scale then rotate then translate. Can i use a single matrix for all components of a entity or do i need to calculate in the width/height of the image/text/animation component. No each component part of your scene has its own matrix as the matrix represents the combination of ...


2

I know this is old, but I finally discovered the solution. In my game, I am using g.translate(x,y); but I was using a float for the x and y values. So I did this: g.translate(Math.round(transX),Math.round(transY); Now there are no more vertical lines! Hopefully this helps anyone else with this problem.


1

It's almost always better to change a state's object instead of changing an object's state. Mostly for readability, as thats how GL is expected to be used. Even if you have multiple attachments in common between FBOs, I would still suggest binding them to each FBO. As for performance, its implementation dependent, but framebufferTexture is likely slower due ...


0

Maybe an old topic, but for those unity devs out there... they are bringing the stencil buffer to free version in untiy 4.6, this way, you can make basic mirrors with the ability to cull objects out of the other side.


2

A single animated movie could take many years to render on a single beast of a machine. Since it is pre-rendered it does not matter how much costly effects like light bounces, shadows, etc we add to the scene. These movies usually get rendered by render farms where thousands of PC's are linked together working on the same job. The reason we cannot achieve ...


3

It's worth adding that movie animation usually does a good deal of visual trickery to make perceived motion more fluid. Animators may, for instance, use traditional hand-animation techniques which are not typically used in realtime rendering, such as smears, multiples or warping to produce more fluid-looking motion despite the lower framerate which movies ...


2

Pixel color addresing is bad, it will work on a square but not on a rectangle. Change this: colors[ x * texture.Width + y ] = borderColor; colors[ x * texture.Height + y ] = Color.Transparent; To this: colors[ x + texture.Width * y ] = borderColor; colors[ x + texture.Width * y ] = Color.Transparent; EDIT: If you are using the other method, your ...


10

What about animated movies rendering for hours and hours makes them so beautiful while in-game live rendering is less beautiful (from a general point of view)? You're assuming that the difference is simply in the render -- in an animated movie, there's also a chance for editing after the fact. They might have effects composited in that would have been ...


4

To answer one of the questions the OP asked in a comment: "So who should be the main culprit? Polygon level or ray tracing?" This question is more difficult than it looks. I think a good rule of thumb is the following equation (which I made up by the way): number of calculations = {polygons} * {light sources} * {effects} Basically, this means that ...


7

The other answers cover the raw graphics issues in good detail, but don't mention an important part of the realism of games vs. movies and trailers: the animations and camera movements. In a movie or trailer, each movement of people and cameras can be carefully coordinated to show just the right emotion for the moment, and they never need to be repeated. In ...


7

Adding to the other great answers that were already posted, it is worth noting that in order to achieve the fast processing times that games need, game developers need to bake many of their visual effects as simple textures. This means that great care must be taken in avoiding effect that won't bake well. One important effect that's hard to bake for video ...


36

Besides the time factor, it's worth noting that in a movie, the artist has complete control over what the viewer will and won't look at. In your typical movie scene, the camera won't spend much time pointed at the ceiling, or pointed into a dark corner of the room, or aimed at someone's ankle, so the polygon and texturing budget for those elements will be ...


94

You already mentioned one of the central points: Time. In the process behind rendering a high fidelity animation, multiple different approaches and algorithms are used (all usually combined under the term "Global Illumination"), with Ray-Tracing being one of the most common ones (others include for example Radiosity and Ambient Occlusion). Ray-Tracing ...


8

You kind of answered your own question already. Animated movies generally usually have a higher level of detail which causes a long render time for each individual frame. Games on the other hand don't have quite as much detail in them, because the scene has to be rendered 30 or more times per second. That's also why developers try to reuse as much assets ...



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