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0

You need to tweak the shader file. Most probably there will be calculations based on the z axis. You need to take out all the z axis consideration from the calculation. For Example:- o.pos.xy += offset * o.pos.z * _Outline; Change to o.pos.xy += offset * _Outline; As every shader is different, I don't know if it will work for you, but it definitely ...


1

It is difficult to answer these questions with much clarity because they are conceptual and the concept applied to each of these could be widely different depending on the engine and needs of any particular game. So I'm going to try to be fairly general. 1. Scene Manager The scene manager keeps track of the scenes in a game, allowing to switch between ...


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Well, the problem was that my sprites size weren’t a multiple of 32 so the scale and the geometric calculation were not as accurate as I expected to be. Theoretically it had to work! But it didn’t. I used someones advises and it works fine now. here is the answer that I found for my question http://flarerpg.org/tutorials/isometric_tiles/ And this is the ...


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Actually the author of Ink wrote a blog post explaining just that ! He is using Game Maker "surfaces" which are I think the equivalent of Framebufer Objects with color texture attachments in OpenGL.


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Best practices: One central loop in main / rendering thread which also handles sound, network buffering etc. - basically, this centralises communication with OS and other threads. All processor-intensive tasks (for example, mesh building, AI, physics) may be submitted ad-hoc, in bite-sized work units, to existing worker threads. These threads are kept ...


1

In signal processing field, aliasing refer to the misidentification of signal frequency. For example, due to the lack of the adequate consideration in under-sampling step it may lead to the generating errors and distortion. It can be generalized to the 2D discrete signal such as an image.


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I think there can be a simpler approach in which you can do this , and still use Unity Mecanim for the animation. Steps:- 1) You can programatically assign texture 2D sprites from the image, and as it is a grid it wont be much difficult to do so. In the following answer the user has created his own sprite slicer and saved into the directory (optional else ...


64

Adding to the other two answers, here is a more intuitive explanation of what happens. The grid squares represent pixels. The red polygon on the left is the shape being drawn, represented internally as a sequence of points. When it is rendered, it is converted from a list of points to a buffer of pixel colors. The discrete sampling determines which pixels ...


114

The accepted answer is not strictly correct, although it addresses the most common usage in computer graphics. Aliasing is a fundamental concept in signal processing and the mathematical theory of it predates computer displays. It is also not really true that "it is a side effect of the fact that pixels are square". Aliasing exists any time you discretely ...


57

Is it a physical phenomena ? or numerical ? This question sorta implies to me that you don't actually know what aliasing/anti-aliasing means. I mean, you say you "know what it looks like" but if you actually knew what the terms mean, you'd probably realize your question is nonsensical. Aliasing is a side-effect of how computer graphics are rendered, and ...


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If its single player it doesn't really matter. In multiplayer what about just having a collision box showing what they can view. If they are in a dark area tell the client to not draw other players/stage objects/etc at all until they are in field view collision box.


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After another hour of researching and trying I finally solved the problem. As Shiro suspected it was not the rendering code that causes the problem. I tried it with models from which I know they worked for other projects and they were drawn just fine. So I began to search for issues with the lamp model itself. With the current Blender exporter, there is no ...


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This projection matrix should do the trick: .tg {border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0;} .tg td{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;padding:10px 5px;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;overflow:hidden;word-break:normal;} .tg th{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;font-weight:normal;padding:10px ...


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I guess it's something wrong with your normal buffer. Render out the normal buffer to screen and make sure it's in view space. (or world if the depth is so)


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I think I know what is wrong. It seems like some of faces in your model have one side. Try to open your model in blender, match three vertices that makes some triangle you cant see and use ctrl + N (in edit mode as far as I remember). It should flip your face, so it would be visible. When I had that that problem I did that with every single face, but there ...


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I'm not sure what causes this problem completely, but I think that some blender models are just plain not supported well in XNA and the FBX format. This has happened to me before, and my solution was to export the model as STL, upload it to here: https://netfabb.azurewebsites.net/ and import it back into blender and export as FBX. The only downside is that ...


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Looks like a export setting. Make sure the model is triangulated on export or prior. Also I assume your draw call is set to indices with individual triangles? Might be worth checking if you get TriangleStrips exported.


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Some ideas: You could ignore the issue, and do what you're currently doing. Assuming those texture and shader comparisons are to OpenGL IDs (which are just integers), it's unlikely those checks are going to create a huge performance bottleneck. Comparison of integer values on modern CPUs is rather fast. Unless your profiler has told you this is currently a ...


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You could use a large texture for procedurally generating those decals on the GPU. You could draw them in a way where they take the angle, density, viscosity, velocity (whatever you want) into account when drawing them. A 1024×1024 surface would give you 256 different 64x64 decals at any given time. You choose to use 2 blocks for longer "smears" if that's ...


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From the video, it seems that the resolution isn't terribly high. If this isn't a problem, you could always use a single pixel buffer that you blit to the screen every frame, otherwise known as "software rendering". Then you can have effects as fancy as you can code. Before the 3D-accelerated days, old-school games got away with this because most screen ...


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You can draw the polygons easily, if you attach the DebugView from farseer, in your physics simulation. If this is not what you want, you will need to write your own renderer, which is not going to be a trivial task. You could also extend the DebugView from the Farseer library, seeing as it is open source.



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