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4

Indeed, the values stored in the z-buffer are not linear to the actual z coordinates of your objects, but to their reciprocal, in order to give more resolution to what's near the eye than to what's closer to the back plane. What you do is that you map your zNear to 0 and your zFar to 1. For zNear=1 and zFar=2, it should look like this The way to ...


4

Yes, generally, games are a single main loop. Games in Java may have a separate main loop for each menu/screen/mode due to Java's idioms, but that of course does not solve your animation wait problem. For things like the problem you are running into, consider using events. e.g., when your animation system finishes playing an animation, it can send out an ...


3

which means I can only see half the model You can never see the "back" half of the model :P The following is a high-level overview listing some of the LOD considerations for this type of game. 100% of it may not apply to your game and/or KSP. Also, I haven't specified any implementation details for Unity, since I don't know them yet; rather than define ...


2

Usually bloom is done with HDR rendering where you use a floating point (usually 16 bits per channel) texture for rendering to. Things that are brighter than 1.0 get bloom applied. Things that are 1.0 or less don't get any bloom. You render everything to the same texture, and remove anything that's not bright enough to bloom when you start processing the ...


1

I use MRT rendering for this; I render everything into both a diffuse map and a glow map. I then blur the glow map into a bloom-like effect, and add it back on top of the diffuse map as a post-processing effect. This way I can make objects that glow (by drawing their diffuse color into both the diffuse and the glow map), objects that don't glow (by ...


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The issue is that you need a LOD algorithm. LOD stands for level of detail and it means essentially your sphere is only as big as it needs to be in each situation. When you are far away it uses fewer polygons. When you are zoomed in close, maybe only part of the sphere is in memory, and that visible section has a lot more detail than usual. There's lots ...



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