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Physically based rendering basically means that you strive to have realistic materials and lighting calculations. The way you do this can vary a bit (or a lot) depending on application, but the main idea is that no material can reflect more light back than hits it, and preferably you want to measure the Bidirectional reflectance distribution function (or ...


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Look into "Hardware Instancing." This let's you store multiple transform matrices in a buffer. However, if nothing is particularly changing with these meshes I would have them all in a few VBO's. http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/opengl/opengl-instancing-demystified-r3226


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Use multiple World matrices to draw the same geometry over and over. I come from XNA, but was able to Google my way to this point in a few minutes. Someone that knows what their doing could post a much better answer in a similar number of minutes, if they wanted. I don't know how to write the commented parts... glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT); ...


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In theory, it will take the same time to render regardless. However, if a point occluded points in the back, then some pixels may be discarded before they are rasterized (because they failed the depth test), and I can imagine that that would be slightly faster.


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Physcially-Based Rendering (PBR) is really a modern tag people use to refer to the trend of making the rendering system "correct" with regard to the real-world physics of light interacting with surfaces, rather than an exact definition of a full rendering system. In other words, I would say PBR is more a definition of the aspiration of the system than what ...


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The basic difference is simple: The standard Rendering pipeline configures the GPU so it processes data as vertices, then rasterizes them into points/lines/triangles, and then processes the result as pixels which are written into a buffer using optional blending. A DirectCompute shader just takes data from a buffer and then process them in parallel to ...


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The idea of phsically based rendering is to reach a closer approximation of how light behaves in the real world and use this model to generate a 2d impression of a 3d scene. This is basically what we are doing since the invention of 3d graphics, just with more simplified models of optics. So yes, PBR is mostly a buzzword. A perfect approximation of ...


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Rendering is a very generic term which is basically can be defined as "creating an image", which can be, obviously, created in many ways. For example if you fill memory with color values (software rendering) it is also a "rendering". Shaders are completely other thing. They are related to how modern GPUs work. Say you want to render a triangle. You supply ...


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To begin with, most real time rendering is done by rasterization, rather than ray tracing. While much faster, it means that we're essentially imitating how light works rather than simulating it. We get an even bigger speed boost by "baking" our static lighting information into the environment. Ambient lighting is the base level of light, or the minimum ...


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You should have only 1 VBO that contains all of your squares and render it in one single draw call. Use a texture atlas to combine all your snowflake textures. Also, look into using a geometry shader to do point sprite expansion, this can reduce your VBO to a single vec4 encoding it as (position.x, position.y, position.z, angle). Have the geometry shader ...


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Those terms are very imprecisely defined, and their definitions will vary from person to person, or from engine to engine. There is a quick and easy introduction at this page, you may want to take a look at it. I've only done games, so I can't tell you much about films. This being a game development Q/A, it is unlikely that you will find many people with ...


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If what you have is indeed are the same models, just scaled differently, then you can create just one of each models/shapes. Then, at render, pass a model transformation matrix that will move/rotate/scale the model in vertex shader as it should be.



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