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3

Here are some more thoughts to complement the existing answer. Gaffer On Games has a great article on game loops that has been referenced everywhere. Your game loop should have different independent stages: Input, Update, Render. You could for example read inputs 30 times per second (or in real-time for better responsiveness), do 30 updates per second and ...


41

tl;dr don't mix your event loop with your game loop. When you move your mouse, the game receives a load of pygame.MOUSEMOTION events. You don't actually use these events to update your mouse position though, you are getting the current state of the mouse using pygame.mouse.get_pos(). That's inefficient, but it's not the problem. The problem is you are ...


0

From the documentation for pygame.mouse.get_pressed(): Note, remember to call pygame.event.get() before this function. Otherwise it will not work.


1

As an answer to this question and to most of the comments. Try making some other games first. Since you are a beginner, creating a multiplayer tic-tac-toe (as Shiro suggested) will be hard enough. Even if you can manage to create that creating an MMO is a massive task that most of us, and definitely the beginners, will underestimate. For example: how will ...


3

As for your implied question of how do I reduce the file sizes of music, you have these options: Better compression 60MB for 6 music tracks and 4 or 5 sound effects is too big. I'm guessing you either have really long tracks, or they are very high quality and/or lightly compressed, but usually there is no reason to do so: Unless you are catering to ...


2

Music was made using "tracker" software. You'd have a small bank of samples, and would set up a list of times and pitches at which to play those samples. So the memory taken up was a fraction of what it would be if you encoded the final audio itself. If you listen to the music from the Amiga game Agony on level one, this is readily apparent: ...



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