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30

Lots of solutions: Limited Skips Players can skip up to X times, and clearing a previous level gets the skip back Skip after repeated failure If your puzzle can be failed then after a certain number of failures instead of just a retry button there is a skip button as well. Multiple Levels of Success For example, beating a level rewards 1, 2, or 3 ...


16

The situation you describe is called a "wall kick". A wall kick happens when a player rotates a piece when no space exists in the squares where that tetromino would normally occupy after the rotation. ... The simplest wall kick algorithm ... is to try moving the tetromino one space to the right, and then one space to the left, and ...


11

The sequence 1,0,3,2,4,5,6,7,8 only has one inversion: 1. 3,2 1 is odd, therefore this configuration is unsolvable. Similarly, in 7,0,2,8,5,3,6,4,1: 1. 7,2 2. 7,5 3. 7,3 4. 7,6 5. 7,4 6. 7,1 7. 2,1 8. 8,5 9. 8,3 10. 8,6 11. 8,4 12. 8,1 13. 5,3 14. 5,4 15. 5,1 16. 3,1 17. 6,4 18. 6,1 19. 4,1 Nineteen inversions ...


10

You seem to be making a Sokoban-style game. You have at least 3 options: Working from a solved end state. My gut feeling says this is not the optimal solution, because a) there are usually many end states and b) the puzzle does not only have to be solvable, but also interesting. So you should probably rather pursue one or both of the other 2 options: ...


10

Sounds kind of like a directed graph problem. Start at the beginning, for each branching in the story record the items you currently have and then branch the graph. From there follow each branch and do the same, once you get to another branch record your current items and branch the graph. This will end up with a pretty dense graph with lots of duplicated ...


9

A puzzle game like Bejeweled or Tetris has randomly generated "levels", usually with a slow progression in difficulty. That alone can make a game interesting. Trying to get as far as possible, getting a "lucky streak" or scoring the most points. One thing that's really important is that the gameplay feels right. Controls should be simple and intuitive, ...


9

At first glance, this seems to me to be a single agent search problem. That is: you have one agent (the AI "player"). There's a game state representing the state of the game board and queue, and you have a successor function that can generate new states from a given state. There's also a goal criteria that tells you when the state is the "solved" state. And ...


8

Considering your background, this is a great choice as a way to get into game development. As far as advice and suggestions go, here are some ideas. What should I read? There are quite a few sites out there that post tutorials and news regarding Windows Phone / XNA development. Most important (in my opinion) to get you started is the official Education ...


8

This is a good use-case for a Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture as often used in software engineering. Keep your model (board contents) and view (how does it look) as separate parts of your program. Motivating example Say you have a board that looks like this: You then delete the red pieces and want to animate the replacement pieces falling from ...


7

First of all, don't discount the other people you need. Some games require mostly artists and some require mostly programmers. A game which requires you to move blocks around a dynamic world probably needs more programmers, but a game where you travel the world playing cards probably needs more artists. The other thing to consider is the other aspects of ...


7

wkerslake has some good answers - multiple levels of success has been used to great effect in games like Cut the Rope and Angry Birds, among many others. But I'm surprised not to see any answers recommending the solution used by Guitar Hero, Super Meat Boy, and many other games, which I'll call "gating." Divide your levels up into chunks, say "Easy, ...


7

I drew it. What everything means Coloured backgrounds are the layout of filled squares just after a block has been placed. Red circles are locations that could potentially be the top-left corner of a quad. Red lines are on squares around a potential corner that must be filled for the shape to be a quad. Red crosses are locations that were checked and ...


6

For the Pirate Poppers puzzle mode, I generated the levels randomly based on some parameters related to difficulty. Difficulty is always difficult to measure objectively, but in this case there were some variables that were good indicators (chain length, number of different colors, nesting level of the combos) so I was able to generate pretty good puzzles ...


6

See the paper: Automatic making of Sokoban problems From the abstract: This paper describes our program that makes Sokoban problems automatically. Sokoban is one of one-person puzzles invented in Japan. The program consists of three stages: generation, checking and evaluation. First, candidates for problems are generated randomly by a prototype and ...


6

Some thoughts about puzzle time limits: You can have soft time-limits. With this, the game will not allow you to move to the next level because you didn't solve the puzzle in time, but you can still continue playing just to learn strategies, etc. Many people play puzzle based games for relaxation purposes, so it might not make sense in certain scenarios. A ...


6

I have a top selling Sudoku game on the iOS app store. Here's how I did it. First I do have a puzzle generator application. But it's not part of the game's code. It' is a stand along app that I use to make puzzles. It's highly modified so I can set it to create different pattern types, difficulty ratings, number of givens, etc. Generating puzzles and ...


5

Is this game actually licensed? I see it's available under two names (perhaps even more). Does this mean the game idea can be used freely? I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice; you should consult a lawyer for proper legal advice. That said, the idea itself for the game is unlikely to be protected in any capacity as it is very difficult ...


5

I've been obsessed with all things 4D since childhood, so I am pretty thrilled to see dimension-transcending games like Miegakure and Fez (and to some extent echochrome and Hazard/Antichamber, Portal, etc.) getting attention. I think, as a community, we should definitely be "pushing the dimensional boundaries" so to speak, and for being part of that ...


5

Just start with finished puzzle, and then make let's say 10 random moves (1 for every second) of tiles to make sure the puzzle is both solvable and can be done in 10 moves. Make sure your moves don't negate previous, e.g. moving 3 tiles in "circle" or moving a tile back where it was before previous move. KISS Edit: A* is not designed to help you in solving ...


5

You may not want to use a graph, but ultimately the problem is one of planar 6-connectedness. I challenge you to find a simpler and better-suited structure than a graph for this :) I wouldn't be intimidated by the data structure for this -- when you consider how trivial the implementation will be, it's not like you'd be writing Boost Graph Library all over ...


5

I added another answer for an alternative explanation of the problem. You can think of this problem as Motion Planning in the Configuration Space of the tetris piece. The Configuration Space Define the configuration of a Tetris piece to be an (x, y) location and a rotation (t). The configuration of a Tetris piece is therefore three dimensional. We can ...


4

My recommendation is to look at the Python code for Constraint Satisfaction Problems (CSPs) provided with the AIMA project. They use a Dictionary (associative array/hash table) to keep track of valid constraints. Also, there are implementations of several algorithms used to solve CSPs, like min-conflicts and AC3. The code includes a sample Zebra problem as ...


4

Wow. This actually seems like a situation where old-school AI semantic webs, like Richard Bartle thought were going to be important to the future of games when he wrote Artificial Intelligence and Computer Games, would be useful. You basically have a couple of data lists (database tables, whatever), the first of which specifies rules about how things can ...


4

NimbleBit makes various successful iPhone games (Pocket Frogs, Tiny Tower, Sky Burger, Textropolis, Dizzypad, Scoops, etc.) and has just 3 people. 3 very talented people mind you, but 3 people. They also have games that are very simple at a core level of gameplay and art; they don't require a massive amount of developer generated content, which is time ...


4

Just keep it as a variable, i.e. numToMatch = 3. In your algorithm, refer to this variable exclusively when you're trying to determine if there's a match or not. If you want to vary this, say from level to level, I would suggest some algorithm like breadth-first or depth-first search, where you note the amount of touching, matched tiles. If it reaches the ...


4

I have two suggestions. The first is to limit the amount of direct skips they get, and allow them to regain used skips if they go back and complete a puzzle they skipped previously. This will ensure that the user remains motivated. They no-longer have unlimited potential for an easy ride, and it will add another motivating factor. Not using their skips ...


4

At the moment, you're moving the piece with a linear interpolation. That means that every timestep, the tile's position changes by the same amount. position = position + translation * timestep You could use any function there: position = position + translation * f(timestep) Then the position changes by an amount determined by the function f. There ...


4

One way is to "hide" an obvious message that then gets people looking for a more subtle one. Like a breadcrumb to lead them down the path. For instance, pick a line or block somewhere in the image, and use the high bits in that patch to encode a short ascii string like "LOOK CLOSER" or a phrase significant to your game (like a name or date). This will be ...


3

This was also my question for a long time, I'm not sure If it's the best practice to create puzzles but I've got an answer now. To make the story short just imagine a simple valid end game situation, then move step by step backward and get to an start point. Now to give more details: you want the puzzle to always be solvable, from gamers point of view it's ...


3

World of Goo was made by two people. For a casual\puzzle game on ios you need a single programmer and one or two artists\musician, more people will usually only slow down development or be of very little help. Two people (plus outsourced music) is usually the best number as ios titles doesn't really do that much of an income in the average situation (read: ...



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