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46

"I've read that F1 cars are faster than those we drive on the streets... why people don't use F1 cars then?" Well... The answer to this question is simple: F1 cars can't break or turn as fast as most cars do (the slowest car could beat an F1 in that case). The case of GPUs is very similar, they are good at following a straight line of processing, but they ...


40

I've made a few mobile games, made a little bit of money on the apple app store, and have started to almost exclusively use this process. But as all development processes go, you will develop your own after a while. This is a copy from an email I sent to one of my team members. Write out a short description of the game Write out the main gameplay events ...


31

GPUs are very good a parallel tasks. Which is great... if you're running a parallel tasks. Games are about the least parallelizable kind of application. Think about the main game loop. The AI (let's assume the player is handled as a special-case of the AI) needs to respond to collisions detected by the physics. Therefore, it must run afterwards. Or at the ...


28

Personally I would start with just rapid prototyping. For smaller games, design docs are really only good at forcing you to think about the problem as a whole. There isn't any reason to write everything down if you can encapsulate it all in a prototype. Get some game ideas in your head, and implement the core loop. If there seems like there's something ...


26

I'm going to assume this is always worth it if you learn something new (like how to render a glow effect, say). That's a poor assumption. Indeed, I would even say that this assumption suggests that your general idea of "polish" isn't necessarily polishing anything important. "Polish" is not adding glow. "Polish" would be adding glow to something such ...


20

Why is not so easy to answer -- it's important to note that GPUs are specialized processors which are not really intended for generalized use like a regular CPU. Because of this specialization, it's not surprising that a GPU can outperform a CPU for the things it was specifically designed (and optimized) for, but that doesn't necessarily mean it can replace ...


18

CPUs are more flexible, it's generally easier to program them, they can run single threads a lot faster. While modern GPUs can be programmed to solve pretty much any task they only gain a speed advantage when they can utilize their parallel architecture. This is usually the case with highly repetitive "simple" tasks. A lot of the code we write is branching ...


11

You're gaining valuable insight as you work through the process. For any good business man that works on a project it's fairly easy to tear your project to pieces when analyzing what you did wrong. Figuring out want went right is a little harder. How I would approach a thorough postmortem Get All Perspectives in Writing Ask each team member to write a few ...


11

As soon as possible. Making levels will not only give you much needed practice at making levels, it will give you a good idea of if/how your game play mechanic might need further changing. A rough storyline and the core mechanics implemented should be all you need to begin making your levels. Creating the levels will be a great interactive way to further ...


10

Pro development is almost unilaterally done in C++. If you're planning on targeting multiple platforms, this is a must since it's the only thing that's supported on every console and OS. Note: if you're new to this, I'd start with something much simpler like XNA - still very, very powerful, but it'll let you focus on your game instead of memory leaks and ...


8

I agree with DampeS8N. I always start with stand-in graphics. Just squares and circles, until I get the game working. Then I will just start filling in those squares and circles with actual images, just working one at a time. Usually in order of importance (what the user will see more often) Art creation process is pretty personal and will be quite ...


8

There's a great post on Zen Habits about this. If you can force yourself to sit down and work on whatever it is, even if just for 5-10 minutes, that will break your barriers and get you moving on your project.


6

I don't think it matters which engine you use; from what I've seen, steam accepts games that are of high enough quality (polish) and are relevant to the steam customer base. Winning IGF or some such also helps.


6

As this is a personal project, you have to be very careful not to get bogged down in process. While continuous improvement is very desirable, consider choosing elements from Lean and Agile that are philosophically in-line with the simplicity of a one-man-show. In Scrum and many other systems, sprint retrospectives are beneficial, as they provide time for a ...


6

When all else fails, there's always the option of finding a partner who is interested in content creation. If you have friends that play the type of game you're making perhaps one of them is interested. Game enthusiasts who aren't necessarily programmers are likely your best bet. It doesn't even have to be people who've worked with game creation, many ...


6

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. For non-indie games, how much polish is usually a matter of time and money. You have a budget, release window, and so on, and you usually just find the highest priority things (hopefully from the user's perspective, but sometimes from the other ...


6

GPU are very difficult to program. You should search howto to sort a list on a GPU. Many thesis have search to do it. Use a CPU with one thread is easy, use multi-threads is more difficult, use many computers with parallel library as PVM or MPI is hard and use a gpu is the hardest.


4

There are a lot of answers suggesting that GPUs are only faster because they handle tasks in parallel. This is overstating the issue a little. GPUs can be more efficient for other reasons, such as being able to have more restrictive memory access, not having to support as many data types, being able to have a more efficient instruction set, etc. Early GPUs ...


4

Other than what Randolf Richardson answered there are some certain functionalities that GPU processors can't handle by themselves. For example, some of the graphics memory management commands are processed by the CPU since the GPU can't handle them. And there is one other big reason, the GPU is designed for multithreaded calculations. This means GPU makers ...


3

I always come across this blocker when I'm making games, particularly graphics, sound and music, so I'm going to focus this answer on graphics, sound, and music. Finding art or an artist has been hard for me. Then Google Sketchup came along and changed the playing field for me (at least on the graphics front). There are thousands, if not millions of models ...


3

This really wont help make it fun, but what about using free assets you can find online? Where can I find free sprites and images? Where can I find free music for my game? For making levels, what if you could generate them via code? This wont work for all types, for it does for some games. If you just can't stay motivated through it, what about paying ...


3

To make retail games for a console you need to become an officially licensed developer. Each console manufacturer has a slightly different process for this, but it involves showing them that your team is capable to building and completing projects. If you've never shipped anything don't expect to get past this hurdle. Once you've got a license then you'll ...


3

Developers do use GPUs for all the functions they're good at. They use CPUs for all the functions they're good at. What makes you think they don't? GPUs are good at tasks that can be massively paralellized and require massive amounts of computation with either low memory requirements or high temporal correlation with only small amounts of decision making. ...


3

Perhaps you can attempt to create textures and sound through programming? Via procedural textures, Generative music and dynamically composing sound, you could not only create a style that's specific to your games, but "program your art". Seems like that's the best way to program AND create content. You can always use the procedural content as a starting ...


2

Unity is a tool I often recommend. You can code it in C#; that's a long way from C, but it's in the same family. It's cross-platform and easy for people with as much 3D experience as you have.


2

You don't have to use an existing game engine, but creating one from scratch can be a daunting Task. Right now your easier option is XNA and C# for the Xbox. XNA is free but to be able to publish your game you have to pay $99 per year fee to join microsoft's developer club. Unity3d is a game engine which also has an export to Wii option but you still need to ...


2

Whoa, sounds like you're going for a "design up-front" model, i.e. waterfall. That works, but for stuff like games, a more iterative model works better. What I mean is: have a general idea what your game is about. Know, at least, the main core mechanic of your game. Rotating blocks to make lines (Tetris)? Running to the end goal of a platformer level ...


2

David Hellman has written some great articles on The Art of Braid, which is the most artistic games I've ever seen. While art is an extremely personal, subjective process, it's definitely interesting to see other people's processes. The articles talk about how the art began as extremely abstract and moody and got more form as it was reconciled with game ...


2

As you mention it is similar in principle to choosing any off-the-shelf product (requirements, evaluation, short-list, trial, etc). As to [a]ny links or perhaps suggested processes?: For software in general How to Choose Business Software and How to Choose Software, both offer different styles. The first is a common step-by-step 10 item list with some ...



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