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2

IK Rig looks very cool, and from what I can find, it's all in the name. It's about using Inverse Kinematics, prescribing the bare minimum number of elements for describing an animation -- feet, pelvis, wrists, shoulders, neck-base and head. Everything in between is constrained according to artistic factors and calculated in-engine, or baked to a new, more ...


3

First of all if you are interested in generating meshes I recommend to you this series of articles in gamasutra about procedural meshes Modelling by numbers So returning to the main question, generate planes procedurally allows you to define the distribution of the vertex, for example I use this kind of methods to generate low poly terrains So if you ...


0

You could always use LeanPool. Its a free asset on the asset store. It does object pooling for you. Then you can do a simple cull system around the cameras view that spawns/de spawns tile gameobjects as they enter/exit the cameras view. Im not sure on how big your tilemap is going to be but Unity can handle quite a bit of gameobjects. LeanPool has benchmark ...


4

You can blend noise together easily, the concept is pretty simple. You essentially loop through each noise value, and perform an operation on the data, and then save the result. It is also a good idea to normalize this data as it makes it easier to use for future operations. Here is a simple container class to hold resulting noise data: public class ...


2

I maintain an area of ca 30000 square kilometers, holding ca 1 million buildings and other objects, in addition to randomized placements of misc things. An outdoor simulation ofc. The stored data is ca 4 GB. I am lucky to have storage space, yet it's not unlimited. Random is random, uncontrolled. But one can cage it a little: Control it's start end end ...


4

The primary source of such the Butterfly Effect is arguably not number generation - which should be easy enough to keep deterministic from a single number generator - but rather the use of those numbers by client code. Code changes are the real challenge in keeping things stable. Code: Unit Tests The best way to ensure that some minor change somewhere ...


8

I think you've covered the bases here: Using multiple generators or re-seeding at intervals (eg. using spatial hashes) to limit the spillover from changes. This probably works for cosmetic content, but as you point out it can still cause breakage contained within one section. Keeping track of the generator version used in the save file and responding ...


4

If you want persistence with PCG, I suggest you treat the PCG code itself as data. Just as you would persist data across revisions with regular content, with generated content, if you wish to persist it across revisions, you'll need to persist the generator. Of course, the most popular approach is to convert generated data into static data, as you've ...


4

Looks to me like it works like this: You have different biomes: road, rail, river, grass+trees, etc. Randomise a sequence of these like: road, river, road, grass, grass, river, rail, road, grass etc., ad nauseam. Now each of these occupy a width range. It seems to me from the video that the maximum size of the range increases as you travel further on ...


7

I would guess that they've scaled and shifted their outputs into the range from 0f to 1f (0-255) for the purpose of that greyscale height visualisation. They probably omitted that adjustment from the formula because it's not critical to the shape they're describing with the normal map. Try multiplying the result by something in the neighbourhood of 0.5f ...



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