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15

Somewhere between $20M and $100M would be reasonable depending on genre for a AAA game. XBLA/PSN downloadable games often cost much less, and people have made XBLIG games for a few hundred dollars in their spare time. As a recent example, APB was rumored to have cost $100M (MMOs are among the most expensive games to produce).


12

Well, I know on Xbox LIVE Indie Games, they have certain standards that they want you to follow. For example, they recommend that your game can run with a transfer speed of 8kb/s. This is because many people own Xboxes and not all of them have high-speed connections or even live in places where high-speed internet is available (what a nightmare! :-) ). So, ...


12

If you want to develop native games for 360/PS3, there is no alternative to getting a Devkit. Consoles are more than just a CPU. It's graphics card, OS, memory, File-System, SDKs and a lot more. If your idea is to port later, thats not gonna work as easy as getting a more less similar machine in terms of its specs. The entire environment is different to a ...


10

Most production level game engines have what is known as a Hardware Abstraction Layer. This is a generic API that the game engine can use to talk with hardware with out having to know which hardware that is. They just call SoundManager.PlaySFX(SFX_ID) or the like. Underneath in the sound manager however it will know which hardware its actually working on and ...


10

For commercial console game development, setting up a build system to target 360, PC, and PS3 simultaneously is irritating but is not particularly difficult. The 360 dev kit is simply a new a new target for Visual Studio + some tools and uses a very similar compiler to the standard windows MSVC++ compiler. The PS3 uses a GCC compiler back end but plugs ...


9

Depending on your location and how awesome an office and benefits you're looking at, (in the US) you can count on $8,000 to $15,000 per developer per month. This is the fully loaded cost and includes IT and HR costs as well as equipment and other infrastructure. For $8000 per person-month, though, you're going to be in a pretty crappy warehouse on the ...


9

Are you interested in developing for PSN, or as a retail game that people buy in stores? To develop for PSN, you'll need to start by contacting Sony and becoming a licensed developer. To develop a retail game, you'll most likely need to contact a publisher who will distribute the game. In either case, be prepared to demo the game and your company to either ...


7

No, but there is little difference between a PS3 game and a game for any other platform. The only thing that defines it as a PS3 game is the use of the PS3 APIs for graphics, IO, etc, all of which would have to be removed since they are under heavy NDA. If you want to look at game code, maybe check out Doom or Quake (both are GPL now).


6

You need a development kit from Sony to do this legitimately. These are not cheap and are intended for big AAA games companies. This is the case regardless of whether you intend to sell what you make. If you just want to get a game on a console, probably the best bet is the Xbox 360, with their Live Indie Games program. See also: The true cost to get my ...


5

It varies widely. Ballpark is 8 figures for a big-budget ("AAA") title these days... i.e. 10 to 100 Million (US $). But a lot depends on how you count, and there are tons of exceptions. Here's a good way to guesstimate: 1) How many people on the team? A small team is around 20-30 people, large team would be several hundred. Look at the credits of a few ...


4

There is a list of most expensive games and their costs here. Some items from the list: Grand Theft Auto IV - $100 million Gran Turismo 5 - $80 million Shenmue - $70 million Final Fantasy VII - $45 million, plus $100 million marketing Interestingly also on the list are some old games, like Dragon's Lair, costing $1.3 million in 1883.


4

Game development costs are something developers tend to keep pretty close to the vest, so it can be difficult to find examples. In 2009, Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot is quoted as saying the cost for creating a major title for PS3 or Xbox 360 is typically between $20 million and $30 million. Nintendo's Reggie Fils-Aime is quoted as saying costs can be $20 ...


4

So, an hour or so of fiddling and trying different libraries, and it seems OIS (and SDL) just recognises the controller as a joystick and provides me with everything I need. If you install OIS from the link above, and make/run the 'ConsoleTest' project, you can see the output from the controller in the debug window. Additionally, here's enums i've been ...


4

If you are interested in programming the PS3's Cell processor with its SPUs, you can download the Cell SDK and the simulator for linux here If you have access to a blade-machine you can directly compile it for the CELL and execute it natively. It used to work with old PS3 OS versions too, unfortunetely they removed the ability to install linux. However, ...


3

Do you want to capture the screenshot from within the game for some purpose, or from a development PC? From the development PC there are simple facilities provided, you easily use the Target Manager SDK to achieve this (you'll need to read the full description to see what else you need to set up as specifics are NDA'd). From within the game, the simplest ...


3

In order to get on the Xbox you can start out making a PC game using XNA, and if it's good it shouldn't be a big problem to get the right permissions so that you can port it to Xbox 360. If you are on the "a dev kit is probably too expensive" stage, don't even bother considering the PlayStation 3 a potential target platform.


3

I would use HIDClient on Linux for this. It makes your computer emulate a Bluetooth keyboard, and you can customise it at will (add scripting or triggers) since the source code is available. I will let someone else research the equivalent software for Windows, because I could not find anything satisfying.


3

One approach is to use an AoSoA (read: Array of Struct of Array) approach which is a hybrid of AoS and SoA. The idea is to store N structs worth of data in a contiguous chunk in SoA form, then the next N structs worth in SoA form. Your AoS form for 16 vectors (labelled 0,1,2...F), swizzled at granularity of 4 structs is: ...


3

For most platforms, you can write subsystems which abstract away from the specific APIs used to call out and get information back from the platform you're running on. IO APIs are usually the easiest to abstract - all file systems work on some pretty basic assumptions about opening, closing and reading from files, even when you factor in asynchronous calling. ...


3

No, there is no Creators Club equivalent for PS3, however Sony does have PS3/PSP Minis. There's a [rather large] outlay for a devkit though. More details can be found in the Minis Guidelines available on the License Enquiry Page


3

SPUs are actually an interesting special case when it comes to vectorizing code. Instructions are divided into "arithmetic" and "load/store" families, and the two families run on separate pipelines. The SPU can issue one of each type per cycle. Math code is obviously heavily bound by math instructions - so usually mathy loops on SPU will have lots and lots ...


3

Mono XNA will not run on the xbox, Its designed to allow windows XNA applications to run under mono/open gl rather than the .net runtime/direct x. Also, Good luck running homebrew code that doesnt involve paying microsoft for an xna creators club membership on the xbox, Ive no idea about the other platforms as ive never looked into it.


2

All 3 platform holders provide forums / newsgroups which are strictly for registered (licensed) developers only. In general they provide a second tier of support for developers, allowing folks to share problems and solutions in a shared forum with the developer support teams also read. It is a specific part of the licence agreement that the development SDKs ...


2

The other answers spell things out in the ideal cases. Most code is common for games, and a clean abstraction layer is used for hardware/platform dependent parts. However, many games have ports done by an outsourced company, and code diverges significantly. This is especially true with the consoles, but also common of ports to OSX or Linux from Windows. ...


2

James reponse only relates to PC and not for the implementation on the specific platforms. While all engines abstract the platform for the far majority of the game code, some parts have to be written per platform. This includes all I/O including network, rendering, audio, device input & I think video output. Compare the rendering code for say Unreal on ...


2

In addition to what Maik said, you'll struggle to find something with the same performance profile as the Xbox 360 CPU. From the public version of the hardware spec on Wikipedia (as the XDK stuff is under NDA) you can see that the CPU is "in-order" execution where most if not all "desktop" CPU's. This one big difference can make a massive difference to the ...


2

I can only address the PS3. The ps3chain and ps3toolchain distros referenced by ps3l1ght are unsuitable for use with Game OS; they do not implement the correct ABI and you will eventually crash as a result. AFAIK, there are no working compilers available for PS3 that aren't simply stolen copies of the official SDK.


2

I found a good GDC presentation on how they did it in Halo Reach. EDIT: Found another method, for upsampling in 1 pass without redrawing the effects. It uses Bilateral Upsampling, but that one upsampling pass is apparently very expensive. And yet another method: Nearest-Depth Upsampling. This one looks more promising, faster than Bilateral Upsampling, and ...


2

As your client is using the Unreal Engine, I recommend looking at the UDN. Here you will find all the information you need relating to implementing features within the Unreal Engine itself. I couldn't tell you exactly what you would need to call though as a good portion of it (any link that is red) is blocked off only to licensed developers. You will need ...


1

The PS3 runs a variant of OpenGL ES (which is the same thing most mobile devices are using), though I don't know of anyone that actually uses OpenGL directly. http://www.bit-101.com/blog/?p=1861 shows how to create a screenshot an an iPhone, I wouldn't expect it to be very different.



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